Weight management and exercise

by S&M

Several people here have lost significant amounts of weight in the last couple of years, and some are concerned about spouses or in-laws. I thought the gender differences focus of this article might be fun to talk about. One issue I notice with it is that it seems to be about number of pounds, not percent of body weight. The metabolism point, however, probably holds true for most people.

The other article is my current interest. I have replaced the weight bench in our living room with a drawer of smaller, lighter-weight equipment: a Swiss ball (it *did* fit in the drawer before I inflated it), mini bands, suspension gear (Jungle Gym) that can go over a tree branch or on a hook or behind a door, yoga mat, blocks, and strap, and an ab roller. This variety lets me be more flexible in what workouts I do, which I think leads to me working out more often, even when I can’t get in “the whole thing”. The exercises are nearly all body-weight based. I’m also trying to roll out muscles more often, but am not doing as well with that—it doesn’t feel like “work” so I tend to devalue it. I’m curious how others’ workouts have changed recently, and if anyone here is focusing on body-weight movements. Also, I’ve given up on the balance disk—I could never do anything other than flank from one side to another, without ever really slowing down to catch a moment of “balance”. I can do a great tree pose, but am wondering what there might be in-between these two extremes.

Do Men Really Lose Weight Faster Than Women?

10 Essential Bodyweight Exercises

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Taking care of your kitchen

by S&M

This may speak to the many cooks in the group. I’m sure many have thought about the unifying effect of food, or felt what the interviewer describes in feeding his daughter (note: it’s become familiar to me again recently, as my son’s tastes have widened. Last night he happily ate chicken and yellow rice I made. The first few times that happened, a month ago, I literally cried.). But the interview also has a “things to teach your kid before they leave home” list that comes from a different slant than the very pragmatic perspective of other lists we’ve discussed. My favorite part of it is the following exchange, which connects global and local, personal and political:

FL: Right now, we are in an intense moment, maybe an existential moment, in our politics. You are obviously very busy because of that. This is a weird question to be asked, because we asked you onto our food show, but does it feel trivial, in this moment, to be talking about baking pies?

CR: We’re all human beings. We have to live through this period, and I actually think it’s really important that we retain our humanity now. One of the things that has been interesting to me – and I feel like people are recognizing that – is that at a moment in which the message out of some politicians is so divisive, they speak about fellow human beings in ways that dismiss their very existence or their right to exist, I think it’s really important that we have other things that can begin to bring us together. One of the things I have felt so strongly about and why I’m traveling around the country now talking to women is I think we haven’t been listening to each other very much. I think a lot of politicians are telling us what we should believe, they’re not really listening to people. Cooking meals, eating, sharing food, is something that is so basic to our humanity, and I think folks are retreating to some of these tried and true methods of being people together. So, I love it; I think it’s important. Probably the most special times of my lifetime are ones where I remember being around the table with family or friends, cooking and enjoying food together. There’s something that is just a common thread that runs through all of us.

Pie and politics: Cecile Richards on the unifying power of food

I think this interview on “taking care of the kitchen that takes care of you” went a bit awry—think she was more after things like how to refresh your cutting board by oiling it, and he was more into the food– but the topic (from both interviewer and interviewee’s perspectives) is an interesting one.

The best thing I’ve done for my kitchen recently is ditch half of it. I decided a few years back that I like a pattern on some china I have from my grandma better than what I chose at my wedding, and I started buying pieces to complete the set. I also have lovely mixing bowls from my grandmother, but one has a crack, so I asked for similar ones for Christmas a few years ago. What my sister got me, a set made of plastic that can go in the freezer, with lids that seal well, that have an ugly shape, just irritated me every time I used them. So the china went to Replacements.com, and the plastic bowls, along with a lot of hand me down odds and ends all went out. The things that are left are things I intentionally chose. I don’t want to get all Kondo here, but that little pang of love and happiness I’ve always gotten from using the original bowls (which I have kept) shows up a lot more often these days, when I pull out something I decided to keep.

What about you? What do you do to take care of the kitchen (or other spots) that take(s) care of you?

Online shopping and excess stuff

by S&M

I haven’t been around much lately, or online at all, really, but I did see this article which reminded me of the group and the high percentage of people there who use Amazon. We’ve talked about clutter before, and how to get rid of it, but what about the nature of  online shopping habits themselves?   Have you observed changes in your habits in the last decade?

I bought lots of clothing from Nordstrom Rack online over the past two years as I lost weight. At variance with the article, I returned nearly everything I didn’t wish to use (I was caught earlier this year when they tightened up their formerly generous return policy). My son uses Kindle Unlimited reading, but not Prime Reading; our Prime anniversary date is on the calendar to remind me to cancel later this year. I don’t need incentives to shop online, and “free” shipping is easy to get without paying the annual fee.

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/08/online-shopping-and-accumulation-of-junk/567985/

Invisible disabilities in the Workplace

by S&M

We often discuss how to navigate the education system for our children with special issues.   As they   move up and out into the big wide world including employment, those “kids” will need to take on the task of negotiation themselves, in a very different environment.

Life changing tech at school and work

by S&M

We often discuss our favorite new gadgets.    But let’s look at the ways you can use technology or even mechanical improvements  to change your life, not just how to be lazy about the light switch.     An example might be kids and adults with anxiety or other quirks/disabilities who need to be able to wear earbuds with soft music to get them through their work/school days.     Or the use of word processing software for children for whom handwriting is a barrier to completion of assignments.     Not to speak of medical conditions that can be ameliorated by improvements.

How have electronics & other tech developments changed the way you or your loved ones live?