What is the Most Influential Book of the last 20 years?

by MooshiMooshi

This article, from the Chronicle of Higher Ed, asks this question to a number of scholars. Not surprisingly, many of the books that are listed are dense reads. Some are overtly political; others have to do with culture, or the arts, or even the place of humans in a world of algorithms. I am definitely going to put some of these on my reading list. And of course, I started wondering what books I think are important. There are two ways to think about this. Which recent book or books are most influential to my own way of thinking? And which recent books or books are most influential to people in our society in general? What would you list? I am all ears, because I might find even more books to add to my already staggeringly long to-read list.

The New Canon
What’s the most influential book of the past 20 years?

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Loneliness

by Cassandra

The theme of recent book club book was loneliness, which led to a discussion of whether we felt lonely, if we saw loneliness looming in the future, how we reacted to people we viewed as lonely, and whether we were acting taking steps to counteract loneliness.

Do you fear loneliness in the present or future?

by MooshiMooshi

Ben Sasse has a new book out on loneliness and the crumbling of ties in modern society. While this is not exactly a ground breaking idea, I think it is important because I think loneliness and isolation underlies so many current health problems – not just the obvious problems like drug addiction and suicide, but also other chronic diseases like diabetes, which are hard to manage for people with no family or friends.
The problem is, we can’t go back to a world of small towns where everyone knows everyone else – and honestly, I am not sure how universal that ever was. Yes, we have this image of America in the 19th century as being made up of friendly little towns – but the reality was different. There were a lot of socially disconnected young men prowling the West, and people trapped out on homesteads far from everyone, and hordes of immigrants in unwelcoming big cities.
George Will’s review of Sasse’s book hits on all of these themes, and ends by saying we need new habits
The crumbling of America’s social infrastructure presents a daunting challenge: We do not know how to develop what Sasse wants, “new habits of mind and heart . . . new practices of neighborliness.
and also this
Sasse, a fifth-generation Nebraskan who dedicates his book to the Kiwanis and Rotary clubs and other little platoons of Fremont, Neb., (population 26,000), wants to rekindle the “hometown-gym-on-a-Friday-night feeling.” But Americans can’t go home again to Fremont.
And I think he is right

Electric Scooters? Really?

From MooshiMooshi
I had not even been aware of the tiny electric scooters until I visited SF in early May and saw them everywhere. Evidently they are rented out for short time periods.  I saw lots of millenial yuppies scooting about on them.  SF temporarilly banned them in early June because they were making such a mess. They don’t use docks, so people were just abandoning them everywhere.  We don’t have these in Westchester, but we now have a plague of Lime bikes, and while I am all for biking, I also get annoyed when I see these things blocking sidewalks, building entrances, and mailboxes.
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The case for the scooters is that they take up much less space than a car and thus might ease congestion. I don’t really understand that. In cities like NYC and SF,  people already walk and use mass transit quite a bit. Any trip that is short enough to make sense for a scooter is probably also quite walkable or bikeable. An electric scooter is certainly not as bad for the environment as a car, but it is worse than a bike, and not nearly as healthy for the rider as walking or biking would have been. And in the more typical sprawling, freeway bound cities of the South and West, I can’t see why anyone would be using a scooter.
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Plus, people look seriously dorky on them.
 
What do you think?  Will these replace cars or replace walkers/subway riders?  Just a millenial trend moment or are they here to stay? And what about those Lime bikes?