2017 Politics open thread, December 31 — January 6

We have a new year for political discussion!

This past summer Scott Adams predicted we would see ‘anti-Trump media gracefully pivot from “chaos and incompetence” to a story of “effective, but we don’t like it”’.   Adams points to this NPR story as support for his prediction.

Trump Accomplished A Lot In 2017, But At What Cost?

For someone who ran as an unconventional candidate, Trump has turned out to be a surprisingly reliable conservative as president, conventional even — aside from his social media habits, rhetoric and occasional feuding with his fellow Republicans….

“It depends on how you define success, but he has definitely accomplished some key goals of the conservative movement,” said Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress, a group that has been fighting Trump’s agenda at every turn. “I expected Donald Trump to pursue a far right agenda and he is meeting those expectations and he is succeeding.”

But, as Tanden sees it, Trump’s success is coming at a cost. The left is highly energized, and his approval rating is south of 40 percent.

Another view is that President Trump is “consistently underperforming even the lowest of expectations”, thankfully kept in check by the media, the courts, and Congress.

What do you think?  Has he been effective or underperformed?  Or both?  Will he continue to be effective or will he underperform in 2018?

Here’s another question.

Does Trump Deserve Credit For His Year One Achievements?



2017 Politics open thread, December 17-23

Welcome to our weekly political thread!

This looks interesting.

2017 Politics open thread, December 3-9

What’s on your mind this week?

We have a post today:

Family Values

by MooshiMooshi

This appeared in the NYTimes recently, and is clearly Totebag fodder. Surprise, surprise, blue staters are better at practicing family values than red staters. This article goes along with many things we have discussed here. And the fact that families are more stable, have lower divorce rates, and less teenage pregnancy in the blue states has been a trend for many,many years. Two key points

The liberal impulse may be to gloat: Those conservatives thunder about “family values” but don’t practice them. But there’s also perhaps a measure of hypocrisy in the blue states. As Cahn and Carbone put it: “Blue family values bristle at restrictions on sexuality, insistence on marriage or the stigmatization of single parents. Their secret, however, is that they encourage their children to simultaneously combine public tolerance with private discipline, and their children then overwhelmingly choose to raise their own children within two-parent families.


More broadly, conservative values don’t directly lead to premarital sex or divorce. Rather, statistical analysis suggests that religious conservatives end up divorcing partly because they marry early, are less likely to go to college and are disproportionately poor.

So the deeper problem seems to be the political choices that conservatives make, underinvesting in public education and social services (including contraception). This underinvestment leaves red states poorer and less educated — and thus prone to a fraying of the social fabric.

So does better education and social services lead to a higher likelihood that children grow up in two parent families? Or are two parent families more likely to be willing to invest in education and social services? Or is there something else, completely unrelated, that leads to better family value outcomes in blue states?

2017 Politics open thread, July 9-15

What political comments do you have this week?

This video shows world leaders preparing for their group photo.  I like seeing their facial expressions, especially Putin’s.  Do you think Merkel wears bright colors on purpose so she’ll stand out?

Emmanuel Macron jostles his way to the front of G20 photo to stand by Donald Trump

If you want to read commentary on the “fake news” about this video you can check out Ann Althouse’s blog.

2017 Politics open thread, February 26 — March 4

Open for discussion.

This happened yesterday.

Perez wins DNC chairmanship

The behind-the-scenes calls underscored why the race was broadly seen as a proxy battle between the Sanders-aligned progressive wing of the party, which supported Ellison, and those more closely connected with Hillary Clinton and Obama, who largely backed Perez.

By selecting Perez — and again spurning Sanders supporters — Democrats risk the backlash that could come with leaving the left wing of the party disappointed a second time in the past year.

2017 Politics open thread, January 29 — February 4

We’ve had some spirited discussions recently.  Too heated or appropriately provocative?  What’s your opinion?  Do you want to continue this weekly politics thread?