Your Morning Routine and its Impact on your Day

by Fred

A little guide:

7 Morning Habits That Can Affect Your Entire Day

I think she’s rather strong worded at the beginning “You line everything up for success, but one false move can cause it all to come tumbling down” and some things are definitely ‘duh’ for us (plan your day the night before) but maybe something fun to talk about. At least I might learn something from you all. What are your guilty of? Any “secrets” you want to share that might help others?

In order to set the right tone for the rest of your day, experts say you should adjust the following seven habits.
1. Hitting the Snooze Button. “Hitting snooze has a negative impact on your physical and emotional well-being”. Solution: get out of bed right away

2. Checking Your Phone. “Doing this first thing in the morning stimulates self-criticism and judgments in your mind”. Solution: charge your phone in another room.

3. Planning Your Day. “If you wake up and have no idea what’s on your schedule…your day is already off to a frantic start.” Solution: organize your day the night before.

4. Drinking Water. “what your body really needs is a glass of water.”

5. …and Coffee. “reach for the coffee pot after you’ve had your water.”

6. Skipping Breakfast. (bad for you)

7. Rising Early. A study found that early risers are happier and more successful. Both B. Franklin and the early bird were right.

Me? I’m sometimes guilty of #1, but not very often. Now that it’s getting light earlier, I find I’m pretty consistently waking before the alarm. #6: usually I’ll have a little, like 5 raspberries first thing, then (now that I’m wfh) a better breakfast a couple of hours later with more fruit, some instant oatmeal, more coffee.

How about you?

98 thoughts on “Your Morning Routine and its Impact on your Day

  1. I’ve started getting on the treadmill with my laptop on the treadmill desk and reading the news while I have my tea. I only walk about 3 miles per hour while drinking tea, but it gets a surprising number of steps in. I used to run outside at 5AM, but I no longer have any idea how I used to do that. For almost 30 years, I ran before work, but now I want my tea and my Bloomberg news in a nice, climate-controlled room on my treadmill.

  2. I’m not much of a snoozer, and I am 100% a planner who likes routines. So I never really go into a morning without knowing most of my schedule for the day. I usually have an idea of what I am going to wear as well – back in the office days, I planned my outfits for the week ahead of time & had them steamed & ready to go in the closet. Now, I just have a vague plan based on weather and what calls I know will be video, etc.

    Weekdays, I eat breakfast, go for a walk before work, then settle in with my coffee. Weekends, it’s flipped. Breakfast, coffee, then a walk. Breakfast is usually just toast & maybe fruit. On the weekends, I might make an egg.

    DH would tell you that I am not an early riser, because 90% of the time he is up before me. But I think he’s a bit extreme – he has trouble sleeping past 7, and I have trouble sleeping past 8. Neither of us do well if we have to get up before 6.

  3. 1. Hitting the Snooze Button.
    Love my snooze button. Always have. I need the time (20 minutes) to move out of a full sleep

    2. Checking Your Phone.
    I am not coherent enough to check my phone before I have drunk coffee, but I do look at email after I have had some coffee

    3. Planning Your Day.
    My daily Google calendar is emailed to me at 5am. I check it as I read my email.

    4. Drinking Water.
    Yes, I do like water in the morning

    5. …and Coffee.
    Coffee is critical. I cannot cope with anything until I have had it

    6. Skipping Breakfast.
    At 6:30am, noway, nohow, am I going to eat at that hour. Gag.
    I go for some food around 10

    7. Rising Early.
    I am forced by school schedules and my commute to get up way too early. It is horrible and really cuts my productivity. I am a zombie when I have to get up early.

  4. Yes about the debunked breakfast part. And if he got one part wrong I’m skeptical about the rest. I don’t eat breakfast (brunch?) until about 11-11:30. As a morning person I prefer to schedule my day first thing in the morning when I’m more alert. I check my phone first thing for texts. I drink a glass of water before my 2-3 cups of coffee. I get on the treadmill after my coffee, not during. I tried for a while reading on my laptop while on the treadmill, but never got used to it. I prefer to watch TV.

  5. 1. Hitting the Snooze Button.
    I hate mornings… you will pry my snooze button from my cold dead hands.

    2. Checking Your Phone.
    My phone is left in a different room. I only check it if it gets delivered bedside, or I’m out the door.

    3. Planning Your Day.
    I look at this the night before. Really just to check if I have early morning meetings or appointments.

    4. Drinking Water.
    I should do more of that.

    5. …and Coffee.
    Don’t like coffee. But I start my day with a cup of tea (usually about 9-10a)… I’m not big on food or drink before then.

    6. Skipping Breakfast.
    Skipped since I was in first grade. My mom gave up, so should these people. Unless I’ve been up since about 5am, I don’t want food until 9-10a.

    7. Rising Early.
    I hate mornings. My rhythm is approximately 10a to 2am. It always has been. Society has forced me to wake up early and live my life too early. This is also why I tend to go to work early. I don’t have to talk to anyone until I want to (they don’t roll in / appear online until about 10a anyway). I can sit, be in my head, work, whatever without disturbance. Since pandemic times, my body has been slowly cycling back to 10a to 2am.

    So according to all these things I’m a lazy unproductive oaf. :)

  6. I strongly prefer to do exercise in the late afternoon or evening. I am more energetic and limber in the evening so less likely to get injured

  7. We are up at least an hour earlier than in before times. I like it. Ill try the water before coffee. I think it might help. What I need more than ever, with a 16 x 7 noodgy-child-equivalent DH, is my hour to be left alone. Wake up, feed cats, weigh self, start coffee, entertain Shuri with fur mouse on string, get into easy chair with coffee, heating or massage tools, and electronics, refuse to engage with him if he is up for an hour, do my daily Noom lesson, NYT spelling bee. Then I am good to go. No food until 10 at least.

  8. “7. Rising Early. A study found that early risers are happier and more successful. Both B. Franklin and the early bird were right.”

    ^&^#@$#%$% you and your little dog too. This is like reading those articles by extroverts about the wonders of an open office and the ability to collaborate and all that, with absolutely no conception that other people may work differently. Perhaps Ben and the early bird are more successful because people like them established the business system in which we operate, and thus people who naturally fit into that system are better rewarded than those who don’t.

    Even when I got up at 5:30 AM to either commute or go to the gym, I *still* screwed around until about 10 AM, because my brain just doesn’t click into gear until then. Plus I find that a strict schedule of What I Will Accomplish Today just triggers the rebellious teenager that lives in my head; within 3-4 days I’m finding excuses to play hooky and blow off the schedule, because I just feel hemmed in and cooped up — it’s almost like my brain itches and refuses to do what it’s told.

    My “success” has come from figuring out my own foibles and finding a way to work with them instead of attempting to beat them into submission. Procrastination is actually a great motivator: I can get a TON of stuff done in an effort to avoid doing the thing I really don’t want to do. And then panic gets my brain firing on that one big bad thing, and I get in the zone and push on that thing until it’s done. No, it’s not a calm and ordered way to run my day, and I wish I weren’t like that. But I’ve discovered that it’s the most effective approach given the type of work I do and my own particular skillset and failings.

  9. 1. Hitting the Snooze Button.
    I can’t remember the last time I wasn’t up before the alarm went off, so no issue.

    2. Checking Your Phone.
    I check my phone, I don’t see what’s wrong with that.

    3. Planning Your Day.
    It’s planned the night before.

    4. Drinking Water.
    Yes, I drink water.

    5. …and Coffee.
    I don’t drink coffee at all, I can’t stand it.

    6. Skipping Breakfast.
    I have a bowl of a nice sugary cereal.

    7. Rising Early.
    Yup. I get up at 5:30 during the week. But I think he is completely missing the point on this: “A study found that early risers are happier and more successful.” Society has been designed to favor early risers. If the standard workday changed to 2 pm to 10 pm, night owls would be more successful than early birds.

  10. I am always an early riser (thus my handle). These days I am waking up too early though. Closer to 5 than 5:30. I look forward to the spring forward reset every year.

  11. Just found out my sibling and in-law tested positive for Covid on Monday. They are late 40s, overweight. She has celiacs and he has colitis. They woke up Sat morning feeling like they had been run over by a truck. I can’t decide if I’m more worried about their prognosis or irritated at their blithe assumption that they will recover in time for family plans for Easter.

    They are mystified about how they got it, say they hardly do anything. But then Sat morning, their first assumption was that they’d overindulged when they went out to eat and to DQ with two other couples the night before. That’s not “nothing”.

    Anywho, I’ve avoided reading up on this whole thing, have actually stayed home the past year. How do I begin to figure out what their chances are, if they are likely to be among the lucky who have mild cases that vanish or among those whose mild cases suddenly turn very serious?

  12. In the Before Times I had to have breakfast before I left the house. My blood sugar would be too low and I’d be hangry and lagging. Now, since I don’t’ leave the house, I sometimes forget to eat until lunch time. Eating breakfast definitely depends on my morning activity level.

    I also used to work out first thing in the morning and didn’t mind. I’m more of a morning person. I’ve since gone to working out around 2pm, but only because I’m tired of sitting at my desk and need to get out of my house.

  13. I’m the only person in the universe who is starving at breakfast time and fairly indifferent to food in the evening. I really hate that socializing is all about going out to dinner. I always overeat, because even though I’m not hungry, the restaurant put all this appealing food in front of me, so…

    “Procrastination is actually a great motivator: I can get a TON of stuff done in an effort to avoid doing the thing I really don’t want to do.”

    I will always remember my sister telling me that everything in the universe is fascinating when you have homework hanging over your head.

  14. “I strongly prefer to do exercise in the late afternoon or evening. ”

    My preferred time is around 11am. My most productive time for work is definitely 9-noon as well.

    “If the standard workday changed to 2 pm to 10 pm, night owls would be more successful than early birds.”

    I would be horrible at this. Horrible.

  15. Laura – honestly, I’m with you on the ‘early rising’. But for this week and most of next I am working from Seattle while I help my buddy in the initial stages of knee replacement surgery but keeping an east coast time zone presence. Work schedule for the first three days has been 5a-2(ish)p pacific. Fine so far. And it’s great to have the 2-5pm slot to go for a walk, do groceries. I expect to go back to my ‘normal’ east coast hours when I come back.

  16. “If the standard workday changed to 2 pm to 10 pm, night owls would be more successful than early birds.”

    this would be a big + for DW. She knows, but has yet to fully internalize, that the world runs “early”. She’s the same as her parents. None of them understands why medical procedures start at 6am. Why construction guys want to start at 7am when they’re doing work in your house. Hell, why school (K-college, the whole spectrum) starts as early as 8am.

  17. I’m the only person in the universe who is starving at breakfast time and fairly indifferent to food in the evening. I really hate that socializing is all about going out to dinner.

    I’m with you on this. I eat a pretty big breakfast around 6:30am and would be perfectly happy with cheese and crackers for supper at 5pm.

  18. 1. I haven’t needed the alarm in years. No snooze button to hit.
    2. I have my phone charging at my bedside. I need it to read the gospel every morning. I also say my prayers. I check email as well.
    3. I am an early riser but that’s because first work and then kids have forced me into a pattern. My entire household growing up, rose early but in retirement my parents wake up way later than they did when younger.
    4. I drink tea and eat breakfast because I do get hungry and may a something fattening.
    5. Most days I walk in the morning.

  19. DD is in school three days this week so we are back to the alarm at 6:10 and it was painful on Monday. The one thing that made it a little easier this week is that it is light outside in the morning.

    I don’t know how I ever survived when DH’s alarm went off before 5 everyday. It is hard to believe that he took a train everyday at 5:58AM. I am so glad his office is not opening until the fall.

    We had our BOE meeting last night and DD’s school will be five days a week for the last quarter. This doesn’t even start until mid April, so we can continue to get more sleep until that time.

    Fred, how was the trip? Is it nice to have a change of scenery? I hope your friend has a speedy recovery.

  20. Anon, I would say that if they are in their 40s, the statistics are still in their favor. If the comorbidities were late stage cancer and COPD, then you should worry more.

  21. 1. Hitting the Snooze Button. I do not always get out of bed right away. I do tend to set the alarm about 15 min before I need to get up as the cat comes for cuddles when she hears the alarm.

    2. Checking Your Phone. Monday – I check one email account right away because the fitness center sends me my class roster. If I have a new student, I grab an extra bag – its pre-packed – of things I need. I also check the weather because Class #1 is outside and last night’s weather isn’t always the best to go on! Tuesday on, I usually do other things first, unless I am expecting an email or text about something that needs to be done first thing.

    3. Planning Your Day. 95% done the night before. If not leaving home, my clothes are not as planned. I had gotten out of the paper to do list habit. I returned to it the end of last month and things are getting better. Also, making sure I add things to my calendars (work and home) ASAP has helped a lot. Double booking yourself is stressful!

    4. Drinking Water. Within the first 30 minutes of waking up – sometimes I jump in the shower first – and take my vitamins and allergy meds. Always happens before I exercise.

    5. …and Coffee. Caffeine comes before work starts, but usually I take it with me to the computer T-F for work and in the car on the 25 minute drive to the fitness center I teach at.

    6. Skipping Breakfast. (bad for you). Technically, breakfast is the first meal of the day you eat, at 6 am or 1 pm. Using that definition, no one can ever skip breakfast. On Mondays, because I teach 3 classes in a row, I always have something to eat before leaving home and pack a snack to eat on the 15 min drive between class #3 and #4. All the other days, I try to go more with how hungry I feel. We have our family meal at lunchtime because SO will eat more then and it is keeping his weight steady, so I do always eat before 1 pm.

    7. Rising Early. The pandemic and an irregular work schedule has made this inconsistent. I am working on that this month. Mondays are my earliest days – up by 5:45am – and Thursdays are my lazy days – can sleep in until 8:15 am. I am trying to get more consistent around 6 to 6:15 where it was in the Before Times.

    — Other than Monday and Tuesday where I start my day taking or teaching an exercise class, I usually do a very short Tai Chi form before I start to work. It doesn’t get you sweaty, but does give me a boost.

  22. Three things that keep me on time in the morning are:

    1) have clothes for work already laid out in the bathroom (this is also less disruptive to DW’s sleep.)
    2) have my backpack for the gym already packed with everything I need
    3) if I am in the middle of an enjoyable book on Audible that I can look forward to in the car while I’m getting ready, I get ready faster. that trumps reading stuff that I feel like I *should* be reading.

  23. “If the comorbidities were late stage cancer and COPD, then you should worry more.”

    If they have late stage cancer, they should just go to DQ and enjoy a Blizzard. I’d even spring for a second topping.

  24. “Hell, why school (K-college, the whole spectrum) starts as early as 8am.”

    I have had to teach 7:30 am classes in the past. I would have to leave the house by 6:15am so I had time to set things up.

    This semester, both my kids have 7:25am classes, as well as 6 to 9pm classes

  25. I don’t want to think of going back to the office. The office is being reconfigured and I am sure my workplace will mandate all or more WFH for most people. People liked to have their own office space but just dropped in now and then, so wasted space and money, which will not be the norm post pandemic.

  26. I get up at 7 during the week so I can make sure the kids are up- the older two need to log into school at 8. On the weekend I turn off my alarm and then half the time I wake up at 6:30 (sigh) – I am a moderate lark so I can’t sleep past 8. My phone always charges downstairs, I don’t like having it in the room overnight because sometimes the do not disturb doesn’t work and it wakes me up.

    Sometimes in the beforetimes I would commute to work insanely early (545) and get to the bakery at 7, then have my giant coffee and kouign amann and work for a couple of hours before anyone else arrived at the office. I miss that quiet time sometimes, but I don’t miss the 2 pm tired feeling from those days!

  27. “If they have late stage cancer, they should just go to DQ and enjoy a Blizzard. I’d even spring for a second topping.”

    +1. With a chocolate milk chaser

  28. 1. Hitting the Snooze Button. I have to have my alarm far enough away from my bed that I have to get out of bed to turn it off. Otherwise, I’ll keep hitting snooze and never get out. So I follow this one.
    2. Checking Your Phone. We all leave our cell phones in the kitchen at night. I do check it first thing in the morning when I’m drinking my coffee.
    3. Planning Your Day. My work schedule is always packed and scheduled out in advance.
    4. Drinking Water. I have water while I’m having my morning coffee or afterwards. Having just coffee on an empty stomach upsets my stomach.
    5. …and Coffee. My morning coffee is my reason for getting out of bed (that and turning off the alarm across the room).
    6. Skipping Breakfast. (bad for you). I used to eat breakfast right away but now I prefer to have it later in the morning.
    7. Rising Early. Totally agree with Denver – morning people are happier because the standard schedule is built around them. But since I’m a day person (not a morning person -but not a night person either), I’d be screwed if the daily schedule was oriented more around night people.

    Exercise – I exercise before work. If I leave it to the end of the day, it will never happen. I put out my exercise gear the night before so I get dressed in the right clothes before I have time to be awake enough to question what I’m doing.

  29. I think DW would be pissed if I ever used the snooze button. But nothing tops my freshman year college roommate, who one autumn morning, got so fed up with our other roommate who kept hitting his snooze alarm that he got out bed, grabbed the clock, opened the window, and threw it five stories down into the parking lot, beeping all the way down in a Doppler Effect-lowered pitch until it smashed into a hundred pieces on the pavement.

    And that was the last time James ever hit a snooze button.

  30. I can’t drink water first thing in the morning. The mere thought of doing so makes me gag. I start my day with a small glass of orange juice, then have some breakfast, then a cup of tea (never coffee — too bitter for me, and it gives me a stomach ache). Only after I brush my teeth after breakfast can I start in on the water.

  31. 1. Hitting the Snooze Button. The alarm goes off at 5:45 and DH gets up and showers. He wakes me up when he is done, usually around 6:15. I’m terrible at waking up. DH says I act like I’m dying when I wake up, and I told him that is what it feels like. On the weekends, if I’m able to, I’d sleep until 9:30 or 10
    2. Checking Your Phone. I do this while drinking my coffee
    3. Planning Your Day. I check my calendar before logging off at the end of the day and then check when I log in.
    4. Drinking Water. I drink half a glass of water with my hypothyroid medicine
    5. …and Coffee. I drink two cups of coffee while scrolling through sites on my phone. I wake up somewhere in the middle of my second cup. I try very, very hard to not talk for the first 15 minutes awake because I’m always angry that I’ve woken up.
    6. Skipping Breakfast. I try to not eat before 11 as I’m trying to stay under 1,600 calories. If I eat breakfast, then I’m still just as hungry later.
    7. Rising Early. No thank you.

    Exercise – I’m trying to go for a 60-75 minute walk during the day. I go whenever I have a break in my schedule. I don’t go in the morning due to getting the kids off to school and it has been too dark out.

  32. Kids schools start way too early in my opinion. The elementary school years were a torture.

  33. “schools start way too early ”

    We’re not going to be able to fit in all the extracurriculars that Totebag kids want to do if we start school much later.

  34. SSM – if you feel like it email me at upstatenydad (at) gmail dot com let me know here if you do because I don’t check it that often. Yes, nice to see the sun. Went for a long walk yesterday (roughly Wedgewood post office to Magnusen Park and back) and worked up a good sweat.

    Lauren – travel was fine. “full” according to Delta’s current standards, so all middle seats empty. I was up front, row 1, for the short hop from home to Detroit so that was even better. Change of scenery is good. Weather is about 10 degrees warmer than home; daylight times are almost exactly the same.

  35. The world is definitely not created for me… an introverted marginal night owl. sigh.

    RMS – my youngest is like you… he’ll eat his weight in food from 6a through 3p. Very little dinner or snacks after that. I’m trying to convince my family to flip his meals so he gets more veggies and proteins earlier in the day. The folks who give him lunch don’t seem to be on board. :D

    Got my mom an appt for a vaccine on Monday! Woohoo!

  36. “We’re not going to be able to fit in all the extracurriculars that Totebag kids want to do if we start school much later.”

    Many/most of the extracurriculars could be before school. Especially the ‘academic’ extracurriculars. Some could still be after school if the school day was 10-4 vs 8-2. Think drama, band, all the ones that are always indoors. The ice hockey team at my kids’ HS practiced 530-715am, games were after school and at night.

    I think it’s “the way we’ve always done it” and people are resistant to change. And the teachers’ lives are structured around a 730am arrival at work and 3pm departure (extracurricular leading excluded) so they can: get home to meet their own kids getting off the bus, run their errands, do their tutoring/other side gig for a few hours, etc. The rest of the work world would also have to adapt which I think is the bigger challenge than figuring out when to fit the extracurriculars into the day.

  37. Many/most of the extracurriculars could be before school.

    That would defeat the point of the later start time.

  38. Phones –
    I started the phone by the bed when I started having to be concerned that I would get phone calls from parents, skilled nursing, hospitals, etc. at any random time there was a health issue. About that same time my decades old alarm clock died, so my phone became the alarm clock. Stress then turned me into someone who listens to audio books to fall asleep and on really bad nights I need them all night to stay asleep. Normally, I have them on a timer to play for 30 min.

    In the OLD days, there was a land line by the bed, an alarm clock and a radio (often on all night, very low). I do not see how this is so different from your cell phone or using Alexa or Google for these things. Yes, I get the idea that I could be doom scrolling or playing games plus the blue light issue (if you can’t turn it down/off).

    Since both my parents died and I can allow SO, and the DDs to break through the DND, I turn in on from 10 pm to 6 am. If I am on an overnight with Girl Scouts, I turn DND off. While rare, I want a parent or the camp ranger to be able to get a hold of us at any time.

  39. That would defeat the point of the later start time.

    For those that choose to participate in extracurriculars.

  40. “Many/most of the extracurriculars could be before school.”

    Several years ago our district moved elementary to a 9:30-4 day, and after a year moved back to a 7:30 start. Everyone hated it, including the nonworking parents. All districts would have to do it for non-school based programs get on board. Complaints ranged from gymnastics, which has most of their beginner classes from 2 – 5pm, to swim classes at the Y that didn’t start until 9am, and the bulk of their classes from 3-7. Other issues…the library doesn’t open until 9am, so meeting with a tutor before school wasn’t an option. As a working parent I never could partake in those afternoon classes anyway, but our family had other issues with the late start/late release schedule.

    Our Middle and High Schools have starts after 8:30, and their bodies can handle activities that go much later into the evening, so everyone is happy.

  41. “Some could still be after school if the school day was 10-4 vs 8-2. ”

    8/2?? IIRC, my middle schoolers weren’t getting home til about 4:30 when they used to take the bus. It was nearly dark in the winter when they got home.

    I don’t think it’s really practical to say that the more involved activities can simply be “before school.”

    Are you going to hold interscholastic football and basketball games early Friday mornings?

  42. High School here is in the 8:30 – 9:00 am start range and 4:30 to 5:00 pm end range. For my DD#2 – HS was 9:00 to 4:30. Marching band began at 7 am (7 to 8:45) and later in the year Jazz band was 5 pm (5 to 6:30). About 1/3 of the sports/club/tutoring was in the morning starting as early as 7 am and remaining, excluding sports games, ended about 7 pm. For some students, like a friend of DD#2’s with rowing at 7 am about 15 miles from school and speech club ending at 6:30 pm 1-2 days a week, it does matter so much when you start there are only so many hours in the day.

    To be fair, our district has the elementary kids start the earliest (7:45 am) as the district assumes they cannot get themselves to the bus stop alone in the morning. Middle school starts at 8:15 and high school at 9. This way they just keep running the same buses along roughly the same routes with different drop off locations.

  43. I’m trying to convince my family to flip his meals so he gets more veggies and proteins earlier in the day.

    That’s precisely what I do. My breakfast looks like dinner to most people. Chicken and vegetable soup? Why not?

  44. “That would defeat the point of the later start time.”

    But they’re extracurricular; those who want to do them can. Those who want to sleep in can. Way different than requiring everyone to be there at 8am. And a lot of extracurriculars (think sports seasons) are only part of the year.

  45. You didn’t read my post carefully. To Review:
    “The ice hockey team at my kids’ HS practiced 530-715am, games were after school and at night.”

    Same could be done for any other sports.

  46. The argument for later start times is to better align with adolescents natural body clocks. So again, starting school later and then having activities or anything else before school would completely defeat the point.

  47. “Same could be done for any other sports.”

    I think it would impractical for anything that requires staggered times due to limited space. The competitive swimming program that my older kids do has four different age groups spread over about five hours in the afternoons and evenings. Dance is similar — worse, actually. So what would ultimately happen is, instead of families parking themselves there for the duration that different kids are in consecutive programs, they would be doing some in the morning and some in the evenings. Doubling the amount of time spent driving in the car for those with resources, and making participation even less accessible for those without.

    Look, I actually would prefer the model that we had pre-high school, where for things like rec little league and basketball and whatnot, you had a single practice one evening a week and a game on Saturday. I think what we currently have is overkill, which is why I wondered aloud at the beginning of COVID, when all this stuff was actually canceled (briefly), if it was going to cause people to reevaluate how much time they wanted to commit.

    And two months later I got my answer: no.

  48. I would love for sports to go back to 1x week with a game on the weekend. After a summer of no soccer, and fall with a more relaxed soccer schedule, then no soccer from Nov – Jan, DD2 is back to soccer 1x week. Last week she had to decide if she wanted to due travel or rec soccer. She asked which one would mean more fun and less practice. Starting in May she’ll be doing rec soccer – 1x week. She also asked to try softball because some of her friends are doing it. If she did travel soccer we wouldn’t be able to do both…well, we could, but it would take up all my free time.

    The travel soccer team tries to tell parents that at this age, having them involved in other sports is encouraged, but in the email communication it is pretty clear that soccer obligations should come first if they want to continue to improve (especially based on the cost of participation). Whatever.

  49. Look, I actually would prefer the model that we had pre-high school, where for things like rec little league and basketball and whatnot, you had a single practice one evening a week and a game on Saturday.

    My kids had rec schedules for soccer and dance. I kept to that. I was told that in order to get to a competitive level they (and I) would have to spend more time at practice. I didn’t choose to go that route nor were my kids that so great at any extra curricular that I was depriving them of the opportunity. They developed interests in completely different things than the normal things I enrolled them in. They would have been happy enough playing in our neighborhood instead of doing organized activities.

  50. We avoided travel sports until DS was 11, and then only baseball, which he loves & is therefore worth the time commitment for our family. I heard too many stories about the travel soccer to try to go down that road when he was wishy washy on the sport in general. Rec league was fine.

  51. The travel soccer team tries to tell parents that at this age, having them involved in other sports is encouraged, but in the email communication it is pretty clear that soccer obligations should come first if they want to continue to improve (especially based on the cost of participation). Whatever.

    They are just trying to be PC. They don’t want the kids playing other sports at the same time. I’ve had to deal with too many kids signing up for rec baseball/softball and then missing a bunch of our games and practices because they conflicted with soccer.

    We avoided travel sports until DS was 11, and then only baseball, which he loves & is therefore worth the time commitment for our family. I heard too many stories about the travel soccer to try to go down that road when he was wishy washy on the sport in general. Rec league was fine.

    Yes, a kid has to be all-in if he is going to do a travel/competitive sport. If he’s not, he’s going to be miserable.

  52. DD, I should also add that the travel soccer email makes it clear that playing travel soccer in each session provides the coaches with a better understanding of a player’s talents and improvements, thus improving their odds of not getting cut. I get it, but at the same time, we are talking about 8 and 9 year olds. Playing year round in one sport is not my kid’s goal, nor should it be.

    I will say, that around here, hockey practice gets first and foremost attention. Even travel soccer loses players to hockey practice. A few years ago, DD2 ended up playing a rec soccer game on the opponent team because both teams were missing so many players to day 1 of hockey tryouts. The soccer game ended up being 4×4.

  53. DS1 and DS2 didn’t do travel teams. DS1 didn’t do organized sports in general, but always liked to go running, and started doing cross country as an 8th grader. That was the first time he ever did a truly competitive sport with daily practices and travel.He stuck with it all through HS and always enjoyed it, although never a star. DS2 did rec soccer until it ended at 8th grade and modified winter track. He also got into cross country in HS, and liked it because he liked the people – it is a very friendly and cohesive team, and co-ed too – but he was even less of a star than his brother. DD did various rec sports throughout elementary school. She is the outlier of my kid because of the competitive fencing, which is kind of travel-team-like although I don’t think it is as intense at her level. She is not going to ascend the ranks and become an elite fencer because she just doesn’t have that uber-competitive spirit. She does it for the same reason my boys did cross country – she likes the kids on the team

  54. Lemon Tree – hockey is next level insane. My kids are in travel soccer, and it is intense. But travel soccer is like a rec league compared to the time commitment for hockey.

  55. ”I will say, that around here, hockey practice gets first and foremost attention. Even travel soccer loses players to hockey practice.”

    For both boys and girls?

  56. “Society has been designed to favor early risers.”

    I find this to be a fascinating comment.

  57. “Hell, why school (K-college, the whole spectrum) starts as early as 8am.”

    Last semester, DS had a class at 2:45 am. DD started at 5am or 5:30am most days.

  58. “For both boys and girls?”

    Yes. Thirteen out of the 23 players on 2018 women’s USA olympic team had Minnesota and Wisconsin connections. It is serious business here.

  59. Finn, I’m so impressed with your kid’s ability to join in on class in the middle of the night. I know the alternative was to just not take the class and delay graduation, but what they did was not easy.

  60. “Hitting the Snooze Button.”

    Over the last 10 years or so, I’ve learned a lot about my sleep patterns that I wish I knew earlier.

    The most important thing is that I sleep in cycles of about 90 minutes. It is very difficult to wake up in the middle of a cycle, but much easier to wake up at the end of one, with no need for a snooze button.

    I’ve hardly used my alarm since DD’s last day of F2F classes. WFH most of the time these days, my actual start time isn’t very important, so I sleep until I wake up, go through some morning rituals, then sit down at my computer and start working. I’ll usually wake about sleep cycles after I go to sleep. So I’ll often go to bed about 1, then wake up a bit after 7 because it takes me a little while to fall asleep.

    Since I’ve largely stopped using the alarm, I find I sleep about the same amount on weekends, going to bed a bit later, and waking up about 4 cycles later. When I relied on the alarm, I’d usually sleep more than that, and not wake up until about 10 or so.

    My suggestion to those who constantly want to hit the snooze button is to plan out your sleep, so you sleep an integral number of sleep cycles before you want to wake up. Planning to wake up in the middle of a sleep cycle is not, IME, efficient use of your sleep time. IME, if I’m busy and only have enough time for 7 full cycles over 2 nights, as opposed to my preferred 4 cycles per night, I’m better off sleeping 4 cycles one night and 3 cycles the other night than sleeping 3.5 cycles each night and waking up in the middle of a cycle two days in a row.

  61. Lemon, that’s a big reason why he, and all the other kids from here we know at his school, are back on/near campus this semester, so that they’re in the same time zone.

    One of DD’s HS friends, who goes to the same school now, is spending this semester in Utah with some friends from college, near a ski area. They’re an hour ahead of the school, which makes waking up for classes even easier.

  62. The home country has started their vaccination drive in earnest. They published clinical trial data for the home grown vaccine because people were reluctant to take the vaccine without data. The other vaccine is the Astra Zeneca vaccine. Production worries are fewer because they have vaccine manufacturing capacity for vast volumes. It’s good news for seniors in my extended family.

  63. Finn, I have no idea what my sleep cycles are!! I am a very heavy sleeper, I think mainly because I am so sleep deprived. And through my entire life, when I have to get up before about 9am, I have to use an alarm clock.

  64. So my school district decided to suddenly go back to full-inperson school. I think the superintendant,who is new, got very scared by a loud angry contingent of parents. So they are going to spend a fortune, money our district does not have, to buy lots of plexiglass and tents, and hire lots of aides, so they can have all kids back in school by mid April. I am extremely not happy about it, as are many other of my local parent friends. Unfortunately, we are not the loud angry types… My concern is less about “safety”, though I cannot imagine how they are going to deal with the very crowded hallways in the HS and MS. My concern is that the teachers and the students are going to have to totally change how they are doing classes right now, and will waste several weeks just trying to figure out new routines – and by the time they figure it out, school will be over. I think they should have concentrated on getting the elementary students back in, and left the HS and probably MS students in their current hybrid routine for the rest of the year. That way, they could spend the summer getting ready to reopen.
    They are going to permit full remote students to continue that way. The dilemna I am facing is this: DD has been full remote since late December when the constant quarantines starting scaring her. We had planned that she would go back to hybrid at the end of this quarter, in late April. Now, we have to tell the distrct by MONDAY if she will be full in-person or full remote. It isn’t enough time! DD is saying “no way” to full in person. She is doing well with full remote and seems pretty happy in general. But I worry that if all her friends end up going back in person, she will wish she had chosen that too. They won’t let us switch once we have chosen. I am also very fearful that in the chaos that I am sure will ensue, the things that have worked so well for her, like posting assignments online, will be totally forgotten. What to do?
    I also am very worried that next year, there will be massive budget cuts in areas we need in order to pay for this spending spree. If they waited until September, they probably wouldn’t need all the plexiglass and extra temporary personnel.

  65. Mooshi – No decision, or stalling, that they could have made would please everyone. I disagree with you in the sense that I think it’s time to go back to full in person, but I understand the points you’re making.

    Only thing I’d like to point out is that this:

    “They won’t let us switch once we have chosen.”

    Has so often been declared, and never enforced, IME.

  66. MM, my DD’s district announced the same plan earlier this week. I think you will see that most of the districts around us are doing the same. It wasn’t just the loud parents in your district as we had a similar group of parents.

    I think your DD has a 504. She is not locked into her choice. I will say this again, they can not lock her into her choice. My superintendent and Asst Super for curriculum say the identical things as your administration about bring locked in.They threaten no change etc, but they can’t really enforce this because your DD is allowed to switch – especially if there are any physical or emotional changes that occur after she makes the choice.

    If you are really undecided, you may want to select in person because it will be much easier to go remote if necessary. If they are counting numbers for plexiglass and aides – it will be harder to opt in, but it is almost impossible for them to stop her from staying home. I spoke to the registrar of our district and she told me that they wouldn’t really be able to stop anyone from opting for all remote if they feel unsafe in school for ANY reason. Also, they have to let her stay home any time that you call in to say that she has to quarantine. Theys ay that you can’t just opt in/out of remote, but the reality is that she will opt for remote if she has to quarantine for any reason. There is a kid in DD’s grade that has 5 siblings. She has to quarantine more than anyone I know because at least one of her sibs always is exposed to the virus.

  67. Lauren, you may be right but I attended (virtually of course) a presentation by the superintendant yesterday in which he specifically said, several times, that in-person kids would only be allowed to attend remotely if they are on quarantine. He made several snarky comments about kids wanting to be remote for convenience. One of the issues we have had in the HS is that very few HS kids are showing up under the hybrid model. I have heard that many classes only have 2 or 3 kids attending in person. The superintendant clearly does not like this, and also stated that he would start doing things to make it harder for remote kids in order to “encourage” kids to attend in person. That really worries me because the very things that support the remote kids are the things that are working for my kid.

  68. “I think they should have concentrated on getting the elementary students back in, and left the HS and probably MS students in their current hybrid routine for the rest of the year.”

    This is closer to what we did here — the little kids and the kids with disabilities went back in the fall, then they started back with the rest of ES, then kids in programs that really need in-person attendance, then 6th and 9th graders, and then finally everyone else. My only complaint is that DS starts back for all of one week before they go to Spring Break — seems like why bother? But I guess if they use the break to address any issues that come up or plan for the deluge of everyone else, it might be useful.

    MM, I agree with Lauren. Make the best choice you can based on what you know. And if that doesn’t work, remember that it’s better to ask forgiveness than permission. (But if you’re just venting, that’s ok too — it’s a hugely frustrating situation on a very important decision)

  69. Mooshi – I would say opt to go and then evaluate. To your point I agree with you that there will be settling in period. However, I hope it’s not long as they are already in school to a certain extent. Here, too we went from everyone remote to back to school (hybrid) for higher grades. However, yesterday I saw the neighborhood younger kids playing outside at midday. DH looked out the window and was wondering why they were not at school – remote or otherwise.
    My kids school administration has had good practice with pandemic school.

  70. I agree with what Lauren said. In a few weeks they are moving MS and HS to full in person. There is much talk about this, because many of the remote students now what to go in person, but were told they can’t. They made their decision back in January and you have to stick to it. However, moms are posting to email the women in charge and she will change their enrollment. The district is trying to get consistent numbers for room modifications, as well as prevent kids from switching back and forth throughout the remainder of the year. Teachers have posted that want they don’t want is kids going to remote for a month, going back to in person for a few weeks, back to remote, etc.

    Online posting of assignments and what not will continue, because if a class has to quarantine, it keeps it consistent.

  71. In my life experience, authority figures (ESPECIALLY school-related authority figures) make big loud pronouncements about the rules and how they will be enforced and everyone had better shape up or there will be consequences! All the rule-followers tremble and lose sleep, and everyone else goes about their lives as normal, ignoring the blowhard.

  72. “Online posting of assignments and what not will continue, because if a class has to quarantine, it keeps it consistent.”

    This is something that our teachers have traditionally opposed and they only did it because of the kids who are remote. The superintendant last night made some comments that he wanted teachers to reduce streaming to encourage kids to be in the physical classroom – he said he thinks some of the kids claim quarantine just so they can be remote for a bit for convenience – and I worry he will also encourage teachers to not post as much online for the same reason. Whether remote or in-person, this would be a very big problem for DD. Online posting of materials and assignments has been a big reason why her grades went up so much this year

  73. Mooshi – online posting of assignments should not be contingent on how many kids are remote or not. Tell the district that it is teaching best practices. You know better than anyone else how to say this in education speak.

  74. This is something that our teachers have traditionally opposed

    From your perspective as an educator, is it 100% laziness or at some level are they trying to sort kids by level of conscientiousness?

  75. “Tell the district that it is teaching best practices. ”

    Aaah, Louise, this is something parents have been working on for years. My other local mom I am sure will attest to this. A group of us parents, including some well-connected local political types, did a presentation on this last summer at a PTA meeting, and the whole thing devolved into the teachers union president (who I have mentioned before is a very loud and angry lady) and other teachers screaming at us. The superintendant is petrified of her, in the same way he is petrified of the loud parent contingent, and has to balance both groups. He isn’t going to touch this issue. I don’t know why online tools are such a hot button issue for our teachers. Some of us, including me, suspect the teachers don’t want parents to see the assignments

  76. Out of curiosity, can you organize a secret parent espionage cell to post the assignments amongst yourselves? Someone must have an OCD kid who always writes down the assignments.

  77. “The superintendant last night made some comments that he wanted teachers to reduce streaming to encourage kids to be in the physical classroom – he said he thinks some of the kids claim quarantine just so they can be remote for a bit for convenience – and I worry he will also encourage teachers to not post as much online for the same reason.”

    I know I shouldn’t be, but I am astonished that a principal is directly saying he wants to make it harder for kids to learn efficiently so they can be forced to come in person and learn inefficiently. I’m with Rocky: either create your own secret strike force of yellers to publicize how the District is *intentionally* hurting kids with 504 plans just to “encourage” in-person attendance, or hire a damn lawyer, sue them, and call the local Fox news station to report on how the District is throwing your kids under the bus to satisfy the teachers union.

  78. ” to satisfy the teachers union.”
    It isn’t just the teacher’s union. It is also the loud, organized parent contingent. They are all anti-mask, “CoVID is not big deal” types. I heard a lot of them yelling at last night’s presentation. They don’t think the current plan goes far enough. They want everything to be exactly as it was two years ago. This has become so divisive in our town. The fault lines fall on the usual political divide – on that I will say no more since this is not the Politics page (although the Politics page seems to be mainly about storm windows these days). I wonder, next year when things are more back to normal, if the parent groups will even be able to cooperate.

  79. Tl;dr: you cannot deal reasonably with people who are not driven by reason.

    They are driven by reason.

    You’re the boss. Your new employee comes in every day all bright eyed and bushy tailed. On a call you casually mention to Madison that you need the unit testing sheets updated. At 6:30 you get an e-mail from Madison with the sheets updated.

    You’re the boss. Your new employee Ashley is e-mailing – going to late… Oh and I’m going to need to work from home tomorrow. On a call you mention to Ashley that you need the unit testing sheets updated. She says, sure. Day goes by. Two days go by. Ashley, have you had a chance to update the sheets? The what? You said you’d do it on our call on Monday. Sorry boss, you really should add it to the project task tracker.

    How would you feel? Teachers are no different than anyone else.

  80. Rhett, that’s not reason, that’s emotion — it’s natural, but it’s emotional. It’s more like Upper Management has told you that Ashley has a disability and you are legally required to post projects and deadlines on the project task tracker. You resent the obligation, you resent being told what to do, and so you take it out as anger at Ashley and you do the only things you can: you either find a way to couch your arguments as *completely unrelated to Ashley’s disability*; or you passive-aggressively try to undermine Ashley. That is all completely driven by your anger and frustration at not being allowed to do things the way you’d like to. The logical response is just to get the job done as efficiently as possible, even when that means saying “oops, my bad” and put everything on the damn project tracker so things get done when and how they need to.

    But the driver that I was thinking of here is pressure — the administration is being driven by the power of the yellers, and the squeaky wheel gets the grease, so if you want anyone to listen to, you need to be squeakier.

  81. At the companies where I worked, if it wasn’t on the issue tracker, it didn’t get done. The managers were very adamant that eveything go on the issue tracker because they used it to show upper management how much work was getting done, and they also used it to evaluate employees.

    At my current employer,email serves that purpose. If a task hasn’t been emailed out at least three times, it doesn’t exist.

  82. Humm…

    Teachers as a group love the conscientious. They value conscientious very highly as a character trait. They really don’t like those who aren’t conscientious. They feel those who aren’t conscientious should be punished for their lack of conscientiousness. Attempts to prevent the non-conscientious from getting their just deserts are deeply resented.

  83. “Teachers as a group love the conscientious. They value conscientious very highly as a character trait. They really don’t like those who aren’t conscientious. They feel those who aren’t conscientious should be punished for their lack of conscientiousness. Attempts to prevent the non-conscientious from getting their just deserts are deeply resented.”

    This is so over the top. Plenty of teachers nationwide use Google Classroom or other tools to post assignments. DS’s teachers used it well before the pandemic. Plenty of other Totebag parents have said the same thing – that it is odd/out of the ordinary that MM’s school is so anti. It’s easier for the teachers too. And it’s not like the kids don’t still have to stay on top of things, check Classroom, actually do & submit the assignments, and follow instructions. (conscientiousness still needed) I don’t know why the teachers at MM’s kid’s school are so against it, but it’s not like some “teachers only like the suck ups and want to punish kids who don’t take notes” nationwide evil plan.

  84. Sorry Ivy I meant that was my theory of IEP non-compliance. Plenty of teachers are happy to comply. But when they refuse. That’s one reason why.

  85. @Rhett – Ah – got it. I’m sure there are plenty of reasons, and that’s one of them.

Comments are closed.