My paternal grandpa’s middle name?

By Cassandra

I just set up another online account and struggled through the security questions. I had to pick four questions, and I could only come up with answers for four questions and at least one was pretty shaky. I am not sure I’ll be able to remember it. The questions seem so off base and hard to answer:

What was my second pet’s name? I am not even sure which animal was my second pet.
What is my favorite pet’s name? I’ve had a number of dogs, and there were some pretty good ones. My favorite? I don’t know.

I have no idea where I was on New Year’s Eve for 2000. I don’t know what hour I was born and I’m not real sure of my grandparent’s occupations.

Am I the only one who has difficulty with this? Who comes up with these questions.

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87 thoughts on “My paternal grandpa’s middle name?

  1. The questions are terrible. I don’t have pets. I can’t remember what I meant by “my first car” – is it the first one I owned personally or the one my parents had when I first learned to drive? And even the ones like “Where did you meet your husband” are terrible – I can never remember if I put the actual place or the city or what.

  2. Also don’t like — I know my first car for sure, but I don’t remember whether I put the make, the model, both, her name, or whether I used caps or not.

    I think the key is not to take them literally. They don’t actually care what your grandpa’s middle name was — they just want to make sure that whoever accesses your account types in the same sequence of characters that you did when you set it up.

    The problem with that, though, is that I already set up a bunch of accounts before I figured that out, so if I change course, now I have to remember which accounts got the “real” answers and which ones got the fake ones.

  3. I have a list of stock answers to pet, male middle name, female middle name, maiden name, street I grew up on, high school mascot, and a couple of others. It doesn’t matter whose middle name they ask for, if it is a male, they get my stock answer. I do this because like Cassandra, the “favorite” can change, or I “grew” up on two different streets spending about the same amount of time on each, so I picked one. The “benefit” of using mother’s maiden name, IMO, is only useful if (1) your mother changed her name and (2) it isn’t common knowledge.

    Somewhat related, flipping through the channels the other night a family feud question was how many passwords do you have. Top answer was 5. Heck, I would have had to answer 10+, but then I have to write them in my super secret place because I can’t remember them all. Though I do have a general pattern I use when the password algorithm will let me (it has a special character and some passwords are limited to letters and numbers).

  4. Oh yes! My employer just forced us all to change our passwords this week. Not only are the password requirements ridiculous (10 characters, at least one non alphanumeric, at least one numeric, at least one upper case), but to change it, I had to choose 3 meaningless security questions, and then answer all three TWICE!
    There were very few choices. I have no idea what the name of my first grade teacher was, and my favorite song changes all the time. I recall that one of the questions I chose was “What is the farthest country you have travelled to?”. Well, I had an answer, but if I ever go to New Zealand, it might have to change.

    The problem with this sort of thing is that everyone just ends up writing down their passwords and security questions.

  5. MM – We have to change our work passwords, depending on the system, every 60 or 90 days. And, you can’t use the last 2-3 passwords. I walk away from my desk and my computer locks, so my main passwords I use enough to remember, but many for sites I don’t use often I write down.

  6. It was like that where I worked in healthcare IT. And every employee had a stickie note on their cube wall somewhere with the current password on it.

  7. If the questions are obscure enough that there’s pretty much no chance that someone could figure them out with information online, I’ll typically give the real answer, but for things like mother’s maiden name, I’ll make something up, and record it along with all my other passwords.

    I’ve tried to create a system for passwords using a core password that includes upper case, lower case, numerals, and special characters, followed by a suffix unique to that account, e.g., c0rep@ssW0RDt@rget for Target, but run into problems when some passwords have length limits that are too short, don’t accept special characters, or other reasons to not allow me to use that protocol.

  8. AustinMom – Same for me. I use the first letters of a song verse, add the same non-alphamumeric character but change the last number. If I forget, I simply reset the password. There are many systems I use so infrequently that I simply go through the steps to reset the password.

    I’ve started writing the passwords in a draft email I save. Is that better or worse than a post-it in my drawyer?

  9. I read somewhere recently about a study that concluded that requiring frequent password changes is not secure, for reasons that can be summed up: duh.

  10. We can’t use our last TWENTY passwords. It is really ridiculous. And yes – everyone has their password written on a sticky note. Great security.

  11. my favorite song changes all the time

    I sometimes wonder if Princess Diana was tired of people assuming her favorite band was still Supertramp decades after she was 19.

  12. Every single time I log into our payroll system, I have to chose “forgot password” because I can’t remember what the rhetoric is for that particular system. And you can never repeat passwords there, so it is even more futile for me to remember. Meanwhile, resetting your password just requires clicking on an email link.

    (I mean the self-service system where I can view my own paychecks and W-2s, not the internal HR system.)

  13. I’ve tried to create a system for passwords using a core password

    One system I use has a rule that your new password can’t contain 4 of the same characters as your last password. WTF?

  14. I’m surprised how many bank passwords have never required me to change my password with them. I’ve had the same pw with our main bank for 12 (!) years and with our credit union for 5 years when I last changed it. I think the pw for our Amex account hasn’t been changed in 15 (!) years. All three are different but since I use them often enough and have been using them for a long time they’re easy for me to remember.

  15. Our company has information security people randomly checking on things like leaving passwords readily visible. They also check for laptops left unlocked overnight. I didn’t think much of the emails we used to receive on information security and surprised to see it enforced. I absolutely hate when I log on to a retailer site that I use fairly frequently and can’t remember the variation of my standard password. In frustration I have done guest checkout but that’s not the optimal way to do things since no order history is available later.

  16. I’m surprised how many bank passwords have never required me to change my password with them.

    I’m annoyed with my credit card apps. You can use Face ID to open it for a few months and then it says, “For security reasons please enter your password.” Then underneath the password icon pops up and you hit it and Face ID runs and enters the password. So….what did that accomplish exactly?

  17. One problem I’m having is my apps occasionally log me out. For example, when I was flying last month, my American Airlines app had logged me out. I needed my FF number and password to log back in. Of course, I had neither with me, since I rely on the damn app to hold that information.

    Now I have a note on my phone that has all of my app passwords and log in information for things like that. So not secure, but WTF. What’s the point of an app if it kicks you out.

  18. One problem I’m having is my apps occasionally log me out. For example, when I was flying last month, my American Airlines app had logged me out. I needed my FF number and password to log back in. Of course, I had neither with me, since I rely on the damn app to hold that information.

    Now I have a note on my phone that has all of my app passwords and log in information for things like that. So not secure, but WTF. What’s the point of an app if it kicks you out.

  19. One problem I’m having is my apps occasionally log me out.

    I hate that! I stopped going to Starbucks for a while because they kept logging me out every time my phone updated and it was a nightmare to reset the password. I’d really like to sit down with whoever made that decision and ask why.

  20. “One problem I’m having is my apps occasionally log me out.”

    Yes! Very annoying, and usually when I don’t have my PW info handy. Then I have at least one app that requires me to log on every time on my iPad but not on my iPhone. I’m sure there’s some way to change that but I haven’t tried to figure it out.

  21. Ugh. I have 2-3 standard passwords I use for everything. Same special characters same numbers. I’m terrible.

    My HR password is nuts. Every time it asks me to update I just add 1 number to the end. The PW is something like 20 characters long now. It’s written on a post it note on my desk.

    For store accounts, I don’t store credit card info so I use the store name. Not at all secure but at least I can remember it! Ha!

    The best is trying to answer those questions for someone else. I broke into my dad’s online accounts that way. I had a 75% success rate. I got stumped on first best friend. He had 2. Everything else I could answer.

  22. I have a notebook with passwords, but now I started to take pictures on my phone because I need some passwords when I am out of the house I was using similar passwords for many things, but I started to change most passwords after the Facebook mess.

    I can remember my first car because I got it when I was 36!

  23. I know that I’ve mentioned this before, but try to have all of your logins and passwords in one place. This should not be on your phone or in the cloud. It has to be in a place where someone can find it, and they don’t need a password to get to the other passwords. It took HOURS with many different customer service reps for my friend to access critical info when her husband died earlier this year. Also, make sure to have an actual password in addition to facial recognition or fingerprint to get into your electronic devices.

  24. I also have a notebook with passwords, but a couple of years ago I started switching over to mainly keeping them in my mail – I’ll forward myself a “Welcome to [new account]” email, or a “Reset your password’ email, with a message that says something like “username hmother1 pw blog one with initial cap and 2 digits” – since I have a bunch of standard passwords a hint is usually good enough. Sometimes I’ll enter the actual pw in my mail when it’s a one-off and not for anything financial and heavyweight.

    We’ve also run into the thing where it’s a shared account and I’m going crazy trying to figure out why it won’t accept my mother’s maiden name, and it turns out my husband was the one who answered the security questions so I should have been putting in my MIL’s maiden name.

  25. “I know that I’ve mentioned this before, but try to have all of your logins and passwords in one place. This should not be on your phone or in the cloud. It has to be in a place where someone can find it, and they don’t need a password to get to the other passwords.”

    I did this earlier this year. I hand-wrote such a list, in pencil, and I keep it along with my other estate planning documents. Every time I change a password, I erase the old one on my list, and add the new one.

    Note However: Technically speaking, if you log into someone’s account using their user ID and password, even if that person wanted you to be able to do so, you could be in violation of a couple of federal laws (and maybe some state ones, too). The law has not caught up with the reality of how much of our lives are digital. If you ever create or update your estate planning documents, have your planner include language about allowing your fiduciaries to access your digital assets (including the “contents”) of those assets. (That is, if you do in fact want people to be able to access those assets.) Including that language is better than nothing, given the uncertainly in the law in this area.

  26. “I know that I’ve mentioned this before, but try to have all of your logins and passwords in one place. This should not be on your phone or in the cloud. It has to be in a place where someone can find it, and they don’t need a password to get to the other passwords.”

    I did this earlier this year. I hand-wrote such a list, in pencil, and I keep it along with my other estate planning documents. Every time I change a password, I erase the old one on my list, and add the new one.

    Note However: Technically speaking, if you log into someone’s account using their user ID and password, even if that person wanted you to be able to do so, you could be in violation of a couple of federal laws (and maybe some state ones, too). The law has not caught up with the reality of how much of our lives are digital. If you ever create or update your estate planning documents, have your planner include language about allowing your fiduciaries to access your digital assets (including the “contents”) of those assets. (That is, if you do in fact want people to be able to access those assets.) Including that language is better than nothing, given the uncertainly in the law in this area.

  27. This should not be on your phone or in the cloud. It has to be in a place where someone can find it,

    The most important one is the e-mail address and password of the account that is linked to all your other accounts. If you have that and you leave the phone active for a few months you should be able to reset all the passwords on your own.

  28. “I know that I’ve mentioned this before, but try to have all of your logins and passwords in one place. This should not be on your phone or in the cloud. It has to be in a place where someone can find it, and they don’t need a password to get to the other passwords.”

    I did this earlier this year. I hand-wrote such a list, in pencil, and I keep it along with my other estate planning documents. Every time I change a password, I erase the old one on my list, and add the new one.

  29. Note However: Technically speaking, if you log into someone’s account using their user ID and password, even if that person wanted you to be able to do so, you could be in violation of a couple of federal laws (and maybe some state ones, too). The law has not caught up with the reality of how much of our lives are digital. If you ever create or update your estate planning documents, have your planner include language about allowing your fiduciaries to access your digital assets (including the “contents”) of those assets. (That is, if you do in fact want people to be able to access those assets.) Including that language is better than nothing, given the uncertainly in the law in this area.

  30. I know those multiple security questions can be a pain, but I am actually happy when I see them. That’s because I’m old enough to remember the days when there was generally one, and only one, security question — “What was your mother’s maiden name?” As a kid I was always angry to think that a woman’s original name — the one that she was born with, and grew up with, and entered adulthood with — would someday become so obscure and forgotten that only her children would know what it was. This was a contributing factor (though certainly not the only one) in my decision to keep my own last name after marriage.

  31. My security measure is a variety of login names when that is permitted. All finance have the same password with numerical variation over time. Most retail sites now have the same password sports related. I never use the mobile no to access. I use Honolulu mothers code method for required updates on infrequently used sites. Dh uses a paper list in his paper daybook but in code.

    My grandfathers names are very unusual as is my fathers middle. When my mind starts to go there will be a new system.

  32. “One problem I’m having is my apps occasionally log me out.”

    OMG yes. I had that happen with Marriott while I was on the El and needed the actual hotel address, and I had forgotten which one it was, and I ended up going through multiple passwords and finally the password re-set. And since I was on the move at the time, it didn’t get on my normal list, and now my secretary doesn’t have my info any more, and I can’t remember to tell her and will need to hope I remembered it and wrote it down when I got home from that trip. Ugh.

  33. So I regularly use DH’s login details to access our joint account at Vanguard. Its joint so is mine and yet Vanguard cannot figure out a way to easily give me separate access to the account. Every time I follow their procedure I eventually get to a screen that says I have to call them with DH, M-F, 9-5. Well who has time to do that or remember to do that?! What further boggles my mind is that I’m pretty sure I started the account and joined him into it. They may have a default (like the IRS) that the husband is the first person listed on the account. Grrr.

  34. I have to call them with DH, M-F, 9-5. Well who has time to do that or remember to do that?!

    I really like it when companies offer a chat function. Then you can take care of your personal business without having to blab it all over the office.

  35. I’ve set up a couple accounts on my husband’s behalf (he has zero interest in online account stuff). This reminds me that he probably has no clue what the name of my first pet was or what college I was accepted to, but declined to attend. I should probably write those answers down for him somewhere.

  36. “They may have a default (like the IRS) that the husband is the first person listed on the account.”

    Is that really the case for the IRS?

    The first time DW and I filed jointly, I listed her name first, and have done that ever since.

  37. “my decision to keep my own last name after marriage.”

    This would make “mother’s maiden name” especially insecure for your kids.

  38. “what college I was accepted to, but declined to attend.”

    Is that seriously a question? lol How about what was your SAT score or your GPA? Or what was the highest level math course you took?

    I’m the keeper of PWs for joint accounts around our house. It’s kind of annoying because I’m constantly asked what our PWs are. I remember at one point I made the mistake of using my H’s ID for our bank account, and then when I wanted to make a particular transaction I needed him to call the bank. So I switched to my ID, even though it meant re-entering all the payees for bills.

  39. The first time DW and I filed jointly, I listed her name first, and have done that ever since.

    KEEP DOING THAT FOREVER. 10 or so years ago, after I’d been doing the taxes and putting my own name and SSN first as a little act of rebellion, we handed our taxes off to an accountant. She put DH’s name and SSN first, and it took a YEAR of arguing with the IRS before they finally acknowledged that the commutative property applies to the two names on the tax return.

  40. No one uses a password manager app? I ran that possibility past this group some time ago and was convinced by some of you that a little password notebook was far less likely to be hacked than a password manager app. So that’s what I do and as long as I remember to take it along on travel, it works very well.
    All entries are in pencil.
    Like Fred, I have never had to change my bank or Vanguard password. But I also manage a small business account with the very same bank and have to change that password several times a year.

  41. “Like Fred, I have never had to change my bank or Vanguard password.”

    I’ve also never had to change my bank password, although I did it because the original PW that DW set up was way too easy to crack.

    I still have the same ATM pin that I’ve had since I was in college.

  42. “If you ever create or update your estate planning documents, have your planner include language about allowing your fiduciaries to access your digital assets (including the “contents”) of those assets. (That is, if you do in fact want people to be able to access those assets.) Including that language is better than nothing, given the uncertainly in the law in this area.”

    Good tip. I’ll try to remember this when we meet with our attorney over the break when DS is home.

  43. a little password notebook was far less likely to be hacked than a password manager app. So that’s what I do and as long as I remember to take it along on travel, it works very well.

    It can’t be hacked but it can be lost or stolen. You wouldn’t want to be traveling and have your purse stolen and the thief to not only find all your credit cards but also the passwords to all your accounts.

  44. I do use a password app…or at least I try to. I just always forget to update the app when I update my password.

  45. Rhett, that is true but though various credit cards have been compromised over the years, and I have received notifications of hacking attempts at several retailers, my purse or briefcase have never been lost or stolen. So it seems safer to keep the little book.

  46. It can’t be hacked but it can be lost or stolen.

    And if they were smart they’d take a picture of the page with the password with their phone. That way you wouldn’t know it had been stolen and they’d have more time to drain your accounts.

    Also something to check:

    Many brokerage firms, such as E-Trade, Fidelity, Schwab and Vanguard, cover 100% of any losses in your accounts due to unauthorized activity. Ask your broker about its security measures and guarantee

  47. “I still have the same ATM pin that I’ve had since I was in college.”

    It doesn’t reach back quite as far since I think you and I are about the same age, but DW & I still have the same ATM pin as when we got our first joint ckg acct 33yrs ago. We also use that for our garage door in case you also want to burgle our house while you are depleting our bank accounts. And I just established it as my ‘secret code’ with USAA today.

  48. Since this is (loosely) financially related:

    We’ve all seen the USAA ads and, for me at least, I’ve been led to believe their auto/home/ umbrella rates were lower than the rest of the pack. So I’m now a USAA member thru my step dad who served in WWII and I went thru the online quote system. They were ‘only’ about 50% HIGHER than I’m paying Amica for the same coverages.

    No one has ever been able to beat the prices I pay thru Amica.

  49. Kerri, annoying as that is for a couple who just want both members to be able to access the joint account for logistical ease, imagine if you and your DH were headed toward a divorce (I know you’re not!) and he changed his password, Vanguard would not allow you to access your joint account?!

  50. The thief would have to take a photo of lots of pages, not just one. It looks just like the little address books some of us used to have BITD but is specifically designed for passwords.

  51. The IRS does not care which person on a joint return is first. But they do care about consistency, as Rocky mentions. After putting me first for a few years I put DW first and that thoroughly confused the IRS; we actually got a notice saying we hadn’t filed for the year in question.

  52. HM – I know! I keep setting reminders to get it done, but keep putting it off.

    I was blaming the IRS but maybe I should be blaming our tax preparer who put DH’s name first the first time we filed. Hmm. It was his (now ex) FIL.

    I use the save password for this site thingy on my laptop all the time, which works across Apple devices, but that’s only for personal stuff. Work is whole other ballpark.

  53. Scarlett, I too have a little book exactly like you describe. My DH keeps an excel spreadsheet of all the other/joint ones.

  54. I told my kids that they can find cheaper insurance but USAA will go to bat for you, pay promptly and very generously.

  55. On topic, I use LastPass as a password keeper and find that it works very well. Yes, someone could (and has, in the past, apparently) hacked LastPass, but being on the Internet brings risks.

  56. Wow RMS – I saw pictures of the fires and it’s hard to imagine so much land on fire (I have been to some of the cities along 101).
    Here where we have tons of rain frequently it’s hard to imagine land being that dry.

  57. It is pouring here again and I just can’t complain when I see these heartbreaking pictures from California. SO many people died too….so sad and terrifying.

    This is from a large school district that is 150 miles away from the fire, but there is still so much smoke –

    Due to the poor air quality in the area, we will be sheltering in place. This means we will keep students indoors as much as possible. All PE classes will be indoors. We will have areas open for students during lunch like the Student Union and the Gyms. We will also have the library open for students. Students will be outside during passing periods and we will only allow students outside during class for emergencies. We will continue to monitor the air quality and take appropriate steps if the air quality worsens.

  58. Chico State is handing out N95 masks to vulnerable students/faculty/staff.

  59. Those fires are scary. Hopefully people get out safely.

    On insurance, I’ve found Progressive to be tough to beat for auto, and their service is incredible. I dropped them for home when they jacked up our rate a couple of years ago because we had an auto loan over a certain amount. The cheapest we found was Geico.

    Fred, I’m surprised that Amica is the cheapest for you – every time I’ve priced them they haven’t been close.

  60. NoB – you beat me to it! ;)

    I know my first grade teacher’s name – actually the names of all my teachers up to HS, HS is a little bit shaky. Probably if I had a list of my classes I could figure it out. For college I only remember the good professors.

    I still have the same PIN that I set for myself when I started college, also! DH and I have separate Schwab logins but only I can see the 529 plans and only he can see his retirement accounts (for some reason he can also see mine, but I can’t see his – why?). Very annoying.

  61. Here’s an interactive map of the two So Cal fires:

    https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1mvgr5hRYk88TPFFeI2BJOwX6W8NAquwI&ll=34.15385595436471%2C-118.79383628906248&z=11

    Also the Borderline Bar & Grill is just south of the 101 between the K in Newbury Park and the T in Thousand Oaks.

    Last Wednesday night they found graffiti threatening a school shooting on Friday (yesterday) at DS’s school. DS decided to stay home. Based on photos of classes that DS saw from the few friends that went to school, he estimates that 75% of the students stayed home. I think the actual shooting at the Borderline contributed to more students staying home.

    It has been a horrible week. Maybe I’ll put the Christmas Tree up early. Although we want DS to feel comfortable inviting friends over, so we can’t be too weird. I will adjust the timer for the outdoor Christmas Lights to stay on later, now that we have switched to standard time.

  62. I have a small spiral for passwords; SO uses a sheet of paper (now several) which will be a mess to decipher!

    For travel stuff, I created a contact on my phone and put info in the notes section.

    I think the memory where your phone keeps passwords is not one that copies over when you get a new phone. Having recently gotten a new one myself, I have been spending a few minutes while dinner is cooking opening apps and putting in the passwords. PITA!!!

  63. Interesting article on schools – in the U.K. where my sibling lives, my nephew is going to try for grammar school. Grammar schools have private school education and facilities but funded by the state. Competition is intense, so much so that my nephew had to qualify to get into the tutoring class for the grammar school exams. The next year will be spent preparing for the exams. My SIL has already toured potential schools, but first he must get in.
    Not everyone applies to grammar school but a large portion of the Totebag type kids will attend them. Not sure about the education of those who don’t. I was shocked at the grammar school preparation and the pressure from the fourth grade to the sixth grade.
    The elementary school education (state subsidized religious school) from what I can tell faces the same issues as any city/urban public school here. They do offer free lunch and the after school extracurricular programs are quite good. Since they have more frequent breaks between semesters the schools clubs. The frequent breaks to me are an issue because one parent has to take off or the kids are in a club.

  64. I am going to assume that this isn’t typical of all schools in all of Germany. If you think about how different US schools are from town to town, city to city….I wonder if this family was at one extreme. For example, Scarsdale and Chappaqua public schools have faculties and programs that surrounding towns do not have in their schools.

  65. European school systems tend to be more centralized. I think in Germany, the states run the schools. There are no local districts. In France, schools are run nationally. So you don’t see as much variation there.

  66. Mooshi – OMG ;-)
    Lack of focussed concentration was another common problem, with professors reporting that ever more students were coming into lectures with the attitude that they could just look everything up on the internet later.

    The damning results have sparked debate among German academics about the standard of teaching in the country’s grammar schools.

  67. Gahhhhh! Our dryer just broke – won’t spin and I smell the motor. Has anyone bought a dryer recently? I think it is electric rather than gas, but am not 100% on that.

  68. Our dryer is GE. We’ve had the same dryer for over ten years, and 3 (ugh) different washers. The dryer is great, but I don’t know if the GE dryers that are manufactured now have the same quality?? I don’t want to jinx it, but this is the one appliance that doesn’t give us any problems.

  69. Speed Queen, L! Get with the program. (And I’m sorry about your dryer, that’s a huge hassle).

  70. Has anyone’s kids gone to one of the National Student Leadership Conference programs? DD got an invitation and DW is all gung ho about it. From what I’ve found online about it, the consensus seems to be that it can be a really good experience but generally isn’t worth the money.

  71. L, I think dryers need to be replaced more often than previously because higher energy efficiency requirements put more strain on their motors but I suspect a mainstream consumer dryer would be fine. I have Speed Queen but wouldn’t recommend it because it’s hotter than I prefer and doesn’t have a dryness setting. I’d go to a local appliance store (we actually still have one that does repairs) and get their opinion.

  72. My SQ dryer has dryness settings – max dry, less dry, or timing. As for a replacement, just make sure that the dryer can hold as much as the washer. I had a friend recently buy a new dryer and wasn’t thinking about the max capacity that her washer can handle. She just went for a pretty standard/cheap model (making quick decisions to just get be done with it and get it home) and was surprised when she realized that she would have to make smaller wash loads.

  73. My Speed Queen dryer has the same settings as Lemon Tree. I mostly meant I would pick a dryer that let me dry to “damp” via sensor or detect that a load of sheets is dry faster than a load of towels. My previous dryer could do that.

  74. @Lauren — honestly, I kinda wanted to smack the author. She pretty much buried the lede there — well, yeah, after 4th grade we track the kids, and only the top 1/3 get to go to the spanky, pretty gymnasium with all those sparkly bells and whistles. The US could provide some awesome amenities too, if they only had to fund everyone through fourth grade, and could then cut back the “nice” stuff to only the top third.

  75. OK! I’ll call the appliance place the owner listed on our sheet and ask them which ones have sensor dry. :)

  76. My Whirlpool dryer has sensor dry but TBH it is of limited use because many of the loads have a mix of clothes that dry within different times and I tend to check after about halfway through the cycle to pull out the dry items. I just pulled out delicate underwear from a load that had t-shirts that were still damp, for example. And then sometimes the sensor indicates everything is dry but some items are still damp.

  77. We haven’t found the sensor drying to be very helpful either. It almost always stops too soon.

  78. L, at least with the dryer you can survive by hanging clothes to dry until you get a new dryer.

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