Is there a sports bubble?

by Honolulu Mother

This Daily Beast article argues that a sports bubble has grown up fueled by the cable bundle model, but that the cable-cutting trend is going to pop that bubble because not enough people will want to pay $35 for a stand-alone ESPN subscription.

Big-time college sports has been blamed for a share of the inflation in college tuition, by siphoning off tuition and student fees at the expense of colleges’ academics and facilities.

We’ve seen both effects locally, with college students complaining about hikes in student fees to support a football team that relatively few students go to see play, and unenthusiastic fan response to the high ticket prices and even-higher-priced cable tv package for watching those games.  (The stadium’s location 10+ miles away from the campus probably doesn’t help students feel connected to the team either.)  At the same time, one interesting sidenote in the recent Mizzou protests was the light it shed on the relative power of the president versus the football coach within the institution.

Public money for a new stadium, usually on the premise that it will bolster economic development, is a frequent municipal bone of contention.  And on the international level, the increasing cost of hosting the Olympics, and the increasing reluctance of countries to bid to do so, has led to speculation about whether future games will be hosted only by autocracies.

I enjoy watching the occasional game, but I don’t have strong sports loyalties — I’m the type of viewer who’ll watch the Superbowl and some World Cup games and favorite Olympic sports, but doesn’t tune in regularly or follow a team.  From my perspective, I’m inclined to agree that there is something of a sports bubble going in several areas, but I don’t see it popping immediately.  The cable business model is the one I see as likely to change first.  I think it would take a mass student defection to lower-spending Division II and III schools for the big college sports schools to rethink the role of athletics at their institutions, and I don’t think the supply of strongmen interested in playing host to international games is going to dry up in the near future.

Totebaggers, what do you think?  Is there a sports bubble in cable, college sports, or elsewhere?  And if so, do you think it’s due to burst?

Related:

How Taxpayers Keep the NFL Rich

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76 thoughts on “Is there a sports bubble?

  1. I have a hard time watching the NFL in light of the concussion trauma data. I consoled myself with thinking that all of those people voluntarily chose that profession. Then I realized that “choice” may have been after youth brain injury and therefore invalid. I loved football as a child and played lots of it. My kids do not. I am relieved.

  2. Well, there’s an excellent segue from yesterday’s close. . . .

    I have been wondering vaguely along these same lines. It seems like the doping scandals and the daily fantasy betting scandals and the concussion scandals all seem to be rolling up together. And the injuries in the NFL just seem to keep increasing in both number and severity — when you lose your starting QB, two RBs, your best WR, your TE, and your best defensive player, it kind of kills your chances to compete, ya know?

    I think sports in general, and the NFL in particular, is always going to be there, making huge sums of money. But I wonder if it will become less the public darling that it is now. I think most of these physical contact sports require a sort of suspension of disbelief, like it’s all really just a game, and at the end of the day you get up, brush yourself off, shake hands, and go about your merry way. But when you get enough bad stories, day after day, you become more conscious of the permanent toll it takes on your heroes, and it’s hard to enjoy it as much.

    The NFL today sort of reminds me of boxing — back when I was a kid, my dad *loved* boxing, and the fights were a big deal that everyone watched. But then you started to see what boxing did to those heroes, and then there were fight-fixing scandals, and then you had people biting off people’s ears, and it just killed it for a bunch of the fans. I wonder if football is closing in on that point now.

  3. “And the injuries in the NFL just seem to keep increasing in both number and severity — when you lose your starting QB, two RBs, your best WR, your TE, and your best defensive player, it kind of kills your chances to compete, ya know?”

    This is probably a dumb question, because I don’t know anything about professional sports, but is the NFL subject to OSHA regulations, and if not, why not?

  4. http://www.lexisnexis.com/legalnewsroom/labor-employment/b/labor-employment-top-blogs/archive/2015/03/18/osha-and-pro-sports-are-concussions-the-nfl-s-black-lung.aspx

    This article states the answer I would give (with my limited experience with unions) – if the players are considered employees (and with a labor union, they are), then yes. But OSHA lacks the specific standard.

    I love how everyone balks at the injuries during NFL games (and they are serious), but calls the same injuries “part of the game” when referring to the NHL. It’s like Mooshi described with competition yesterday – it’s OK for sports, bad for academics.

    I wonder how many viewers the NFL has lost due to all their scandals.

  5. I don’t watch football or hockey and wouldn’t let my kids play either. I think it’s ridiculous how much $$ college football programs get and the shruggy attitude the NFL and NHL have toward injuries, particularly the traumatic brain injuries.

    I wonder if there is an element of “the people must have their bread and circuses” in the reluctance to regulate these kinds of sports wrt the injuries.

  6. I think the rise of regular Fantasy sports will always make the NFL a big deal. and now almost every sport has a fantasy component. UFC is one of the fastest growing sports and that’s fairly violent and so I think there is a tolerance for the violence.

    Of course I don’t look at sports as a casual observer.

  7. Milo,

    Believe it or not, the OSH Act does not include a subpart entitled “professional sports.”

    If OSHA cited an NFL team for on-field safety hazards taking place during a game, it would have to resort to the general duty clause, which mandates generically that employers provide a workplace free of recognized hazards. Because there is no standard on point, OSHA has a heightened burden of proof. In addition to identifying a hazard, it must also provide a feasible abatement when citing under this clause.

    A general duty clause citation issued to an NFL team for an on-field safety hazard would read something like this:

    Section 5(a)(1). General Duty Clause.

    The Atlanta Falcons football team failed to provide its employees a workplace free from recognized hazards. On or about October 4, 2015, its quarterback suffered a concussion after being tackled during a game against the Carolina Panthers. This hazard could have been prevented by the following feasible abatements:

    1. Replace the current helmets worn by its players with those that include additional padding or other protective measures; or
    2. Institute new blocking systems to train its offensive linemen to better protect the quarterback.

    Proposed Penalty: $7,000
    Abatement Date: October 31, 2015

    http://www.workplacesafetyandhealthlaw.com/post/2015/10/05/Would-OSHA-e2809cPunte2809d-on-Inspecting-an-NFL-Team.aspx

    I assume the NFL’s top legal team would be able to argue that there are no feasible abatements above and beyond the helmets, padding, braces etc. currently in use. .

  8. Even in my non-sports world, I know more than a few (guys) who would willingly pay $35 a month for ESPN, if that were the only way to watch the teams and sports they follow. These are the guys who bring a large TV to tailgates so that they don’t miss the other important college games. $35 is less than they would spend on an Olive Garden dinner. But I’ll take the word of the experts that the numbers are small and that the ESPN business model is doomed. That would probably be true, even apart from a sports bubble, simply because young people don’t buy cable.

    But I still see an awful lot of people (mostly male) who are obsessed with professional and serious college football/baseball/basketball. Maybe the concussion issue will finally drive a stake through the heart of the NFL, but so far it doesn’t seem to have had much of an effect. One of our neighbors played college and pro football and is now the university team’s orthopedic surgeon, and he is letting his teenage sons play high school football. I haven’t looked it up, but I wonder whether the numbers are dropping in Pop Warner and high school football programs.

  9. Scarlett- I agree. I would pay. Look at how many people pay for the $300 a year Sunday Ticket. College sports is a huge business and while I dislike the NCAA and think that a lot needs to change I don’t see it going away anytime soon. Even though several former players have come out and said they wouldn’t let their kids play the sport, several of them have said they would. I just wish there was more transparency.

  10. Public money for a new stadium annoys me. Rich owners threaten to move the team, the public pays for a stadium, and the rich owners can get richer.

  11. If the concussion issue reaches a head, I’m fairly certain Major League Soccer would be more than happy to step into the void left by the NFL.

  12. Look at how many people pay for the $300 a year Sunday Ticket.

    That’s me, although you don’t have to pay that much. When the season is coming up, you call DirecTV and you can always get a better deal. One year I got it completely free.

  13. up North- I agree with you. I don’t think public money should fund stadiums. Considering how much money I just paid to go see the Cowboys, I think the teams should pay for the stadiums themselves. and now that we might have two teams come here to LA, that’ll be interesting. Do you think my property values will go up or down?

  14. Rhett- I love her show! I knew they were big but I didn’t know they were that big. She’s gotten a lot of backlash for her family being wealthy but I still enjoy her and her show.

  15. She’s gotten a lot of backlash for her family being wealthy but I still enjoy her and her show.

    What kind of backlash?

  16. My personal prediction is that football has just passed peak popularity in the US. It’s going to go downhill from here as fewer & fewer kids play and are allowed to play. I can’t stomach watching football anymore myself & I used to be a big fan.

    As far as the sorts media landscape – I think it’s a really interesting question. I probably wouldn’t pay $35/month for ESPN, but I would pay the equivalent for my local sports channel (access to my local teams games & news) plus the two sports we watch the most – MLB and NHL. It’ll be interesting if there is a deal for the mega sports package which bundles a lot or just for the “MLB package”. It could take awhile for all the local deals to expire and be renegotiated though & for things to really take shape. Eventually, I think it is probably the niche sports that will miss out if ESPN doesn’t have the $$ and the need to fill in 24/7 programming on 5-6 different channels. Who is going to pay to watch NCAA volleyball on ESPNU on Tuesday afternoon in the future if things become unbundled?

  17. I also believe that the cord-cutting of 20-something crowd is subsidized by their cable-subscribing parents in their 50’s and 60’s. The younger people I know who don’t pay for cable still watch everything using their parent’s logins. They are moochers. If everyone becomes a moocher – the content providers will start to crack down more. Someone has to pay for content.

    MAYBE they pay for Netflix, but most of them
    share that too.

  18. Rhett: there are several blogs dedicated to trashing her recipes and picking apart her show. People complain a lot about how her recipes are very basic family recipes but that’s pretty much what she advertises herself as- a way to feed her family. it also appears that there are a lot of people who think that because her family is rich, she shouldn’t be writing a blog. it’s very strange to me.

    There are also a lot of sports networks outside of ESPN. They’ve been struggling but one reason is that there are more options out there and therefore people can be a little pickier.

  19. To clarify, I’m not anti-sports for kids. DD participated in four different sports this year.

    What I’m opposed to is:

    (1) Sports participation that requires more than 10 days absent per school year, every year (e.g., if your team makes the Little League World Series, you should go even if you miss two weeks, but don’t keep joining travel teams that have you miss most Fridays from October to March),

    (2) Sports costs that exceed the parents’ annual retirement contributions and college savings, and

    (3) Extensive practice and game schedules in high injury sports, particularly for kids under 14. By extensive I mean 10+ hours per week, more than 4 months a year.

    Extra deduction if the sport has a high TBI rate.

    I see a lot of families here doing all three of these with kids in early elementary school. For some of these families, it seems to be about the parents’ social circles being the other team parents, rather than about the kid’s passion.

    I want my kids to do some art, some music, some sports, some foreign language, some theater, and some science/engineering enrichment. Not all at the same time :)

  20. What Sky said. I will try to direct my kids toward running and martial arts, because those are activities that seem to be easier to pursue throughout one’s life, and the level of participation is largely directed by the participant, not the coach or league.

  21. Sky, I agree with you on #1. I totally disagree on #2, if the parents are willing to pay, that’s totally their choice. On #3, how do you define a high-injury sport? I did my nurse practitioner capstone project on youth sports injuries, and they all have pretty high injury rates. Obviously some are higher than others, I don’t have they rankings handy. The gist of the research is that with proper coaching and a focus on overall strength and fitness, you can significantly reduce the injury rates in all sports.

  22. Also, I like the boxing analogy. I think football will persist, but not as mainstream as it is now.

  23. Denver, how about we rephrase #2 to

    “if you are spending so much on the sport that you can’t take a family vacation, send your youngest to preschool, or make your retirement contributions, don’t be surprised that when you complain about your money problems to Sky, she asks why you are spending so much on the sport.”

    :)

    I tried to find studies ranking sports by injury/fatality rate, and concluded my kids will not be taking up diving (.5% of participants have a catastrophic injury each year). Rugby, ice hockey, tackle football, wrestling and boxing are all between 0.008% and 0.006% for catastrophic injuries per year. Squash is 0.003%.

    https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=o9Qd4E8NFvoC&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=related:eaK46jgVGpbiyM:scholar.google.com/&ots=nOxnPKbvEb&sig=Oqy716PaOQ8IR9tVhisvjEb-lfE#v=onepage&q&f=false

    I haven’t found a study that controls for hours of participation.

  24. lagirl and Rhett – I figured they owned a sh!t ton of land when, on the show, she mentions she has a house and a lodge… both kitchens full stocked and ready to go. And she needed a truck to drive between the two of them… they weren’t scraping their last two nickels together before the show and they still aren’t now..

  25. On topic… DH and I will purchase the Center Ice package from time to time. It’s expensive, about $250 per year, but we justify it by the fact that we live out of market for our teams. The only way we get games is if they are playing the one and only in-market team (after moving from a 3 team market to a 1 team market, we are hockey deprived). But that’s the only sport we watch religiously. And we are looking for cheaper ways.

    I’ll probably let my kid(s) play hockey. Especially at a younger age – it’s not nearly as full-force full-speed contact before late middle school. They can barely stand up on skates. Now, once he (they) get older, we’ll reassess. I’d also let my kids play soccer. I’m still on the fence about football, but that’s because I can’t stand the sport, not because I think DS will suffer greater injury. I also don’t see us being traveling team parents unless DS (or siblings) show an aptitude that will yield a scholarship or “profit” along the way.

  26. Rhode,

    The land area of Rhode Island is 668k acres, they own 440k acres. It would almost be like owning your own state!

  27. I believe that eventually the default choice in the house will be high speed internet, rather than TV. Right now both, for the most part, are delivered via the same cable/fiber optic wire. (satellite TV is common in more rural or open areas, but it not an option in most multifamily situations and doesn’t work without a clear southern ?? exposure). Younger cable cutters often pay up front for netflix/hulu, and borrow their parents’ or friends’ HBO but could live without it, and buy the overseas sports streaming via Australia and a dummy location.

    I use cable because that is most cost efficient for my particular programming choices, but there are gaps. The NFL and MLB overseas packages (no local blackout restrictions), plus hulu, netflix, and an HD antenna in the attic would take care of my needs just fine.

    And I don’t know what circles you all move in, but even tho traditional boxing is dead, UFC is huge – as big if not bigger than boxing in its day. NFL occupies on a larger scale the national sports space that once was filled by baseball, although all sports in those days had a more local/regional focus. Boxing and horse racing were followed in my youth closely by both the lower classes and the elite (gambling has a lot to do with that), and those in the middle followed in inverse proportion to their fastidiousness. Today’s totebaggers are nothing if not fastidious in their tastes.

  28. “and those in the middle followed in inverse proportion to their fastidiousness. Today’s totebaggers are nothing if not fastidious in their tastes.”

    Good point.

    The reason DW said that she and I should go see Mockingjay on Saturday night was because her parents wanted to stay here and watch the Redskins, anyway, so they might as well babysit while they’re doing it.

  29. Yeah, that Ronda Rousey loss was big news. I wonder how much of it was the sport and how much the novelty of having a woman star?

  30. Meme: UFC Is very big. I personally can’t watch it but I know some of the fighters and when Holm knocked out Rousey everyone knew about it.

  31. Rhett – I saw that… It would be nice to own as far as the eye could see. Have your house in Providence and your “lodge” 2-3 miles away… either in the woods or down by the water…

  32. It would be nice to own as far as the eye could see

    If you’re 5’7″ tall the horizon is about 3 miles away. To own as far as you could see would require a circular lot of 16,600 acres. They own way past where they can see.

  33. It is interesting to me that a few people mentioned soccer as being safe because there are concussion problems in girls soccer. I am not familiar with the stats for men or boys soccer, but there is even movement to change to a different ball due to the increasing problems with concussions. Think about that hard ball hitting the heads of kids with brains that are still developing – especially the number of times that a girl on a travel and varsity team plays per week – including practice.

  34. Sunday night football wins ratings everyweek. It is not going anywhere. In fact, they’re branching out to other countries and raking in billions of dollars each year. There are 32 teams limited to an active 53 man roster – so there are 1696 players allowed to play each week (including the players on a bye week).

    There are 128 Division I schools that have teams and by NCAA rules they are allowed to give 85 players scholarships and have 20 more players “walk-on” to the roster. By those numbers, about 15 percent make the NFL. This dosen’t even count for division II and III players who can also make it to the professional level. There are also numerous players on the practice squads of each team. There is no danger of there not being enough players available to play in the NFL.

    People like to play and watch dangerous sports. It’s just a matter of taste on which sport you choose – NFL, NHL NSACAR, UFC, American Ninja Warrior…..

  35. In addition to concussions, female soccer and field hockey players are also at risk of serious knee injuries. In my rather limited circle, I know three families whose high school or college soccer daughters required knee surgery and had to quit playing. Apparently there are improved training techniques that can limit those injuries, but many families seem to be completely unaware of the issue until their daughter gets hurt.

  36. DH and I will purchase the Center Ice package from time to time. It’s expensive, about $250 per year, but we justify it by the fact that we live out of market for our teams.

    See my comment about the Sunday Ticket. Call your provider and you can probably get a deal on it.

    It is interesting to me that a few people mentioned soccer as being safe because there are concussion problems in girls soccer.

    There are also a ton of knee injuries in soccer. There are injuries in every sport. If you don’t want your kids to get hurt, put them in a bubble.

  37. The land area of Rhode Island is 668k acres, they own 440k acres. It would almost be like owning your own state!

    Rhode Island is barely big enough to be a county. It got grandfathered in as a state after the revolution.

  38. Thanks, Usuallylurks at 2:45. Until I saw your comment I was wondering, can these people be serious? Football is king in my ACC/SEC state. I know MANY people who have attended every home game at DS’s university since they were 3 months old, and who can’t imagine any lifestyle that does not include an extended family, multi-generational tailgate/college football game every weekend from September through November. Our high school is like a farm team for the NFL and the stadium is filled with families who don’t have kids in the school. I’m not saying this is all a good thing, but just as it is easy for totebaggers to have the proverbial “I don’t know anyone who voted for Nixon!” mindset, I think it is easy to forget that there’s a very large country out there that will never, ever give up its football.

  39. It is not just flyover country that LOVES football if I were to judge by the number of J-E-T-S posts in my Facebook feed following the game on Sunday.

  40. But by the same token, those who can’t imagine life without football also don’t grasp that it’s not a universal passion.

  41. Lauren-I was in Dallas for the game last weekend and we had a ton of very aggressive Jets fans staying in our hotel. It’s a huge obsession for a lot of people.

  42. I have to admit that one of my dating criteria used to be whether a guy will do something even if their favorite football team was playing at the same time. If the answer was no, and I was doomed to be a football widow – then the relationship was over even before it started. I once worked with a guy that insisted you have to date someone through every season to know as much as possible about their interests and their family. I have to agree when it comes to sports would because you don’t know how much time the Rangers, Giants, and Yankees will consume until you marry into a family that cares A LOT about the teams/ games. I was raised as a Giants fan, and I watch because my father or DH love to watch the games. DH knows that I am secretly thrilled each year when the Giants are done because then the stress about whether the Giants win or lose is over for a year.

  43. Completely off topic. I managed to get through the sleet this morning to attend the funeral of a dear old friend. 80s not untimely given his health issues. But my true respects are given this evening by sitting down with a stiff Manhattan to listen to a CD of a West Coast swing band he inltroduced me to. Lavay Smith and her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. Fred you lived and loved well.

  44. If only there was data:
    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/07/08/after-peaking-in-2007-nfl-attendance-steadily-has-declined/

    From another article….
    “According to Nielsen ratings, 50 percent of baseball viewers are 55 or older, up from 41 percent 10 years ago. ESPN, which airs baseball, football and basketball games, says its data show the average age of baseball viewers rising well above that of other sports: 53 for baseball, 47 for the NFL (also rising fast) and 37 for the NBA, which has kept its audience age flat.”

    So, less people go to live events, and the television audience is getting older.

  45. For the 2015 Fall season, the NFL has the top 12 ratings.

    http://ftw.usatoday.com/2015/11/nfl-tv-ratings-rankings-no-1-show-snf-mnf-local-markets

    Yes people are not attending in person, becasue they don’t have to do so to enjoy the game. Who wants to pay several hundred dollars to sit in traffic for 3 hours, be in the nosebleed section with an irritating fan beside, behind and in front of you when you can watch the game from home on your 50 inch tv and pause it when you need to do something else? DH and I use to attend a couple of games per year but now watch with our feet up in the comfort of our home.

    I agree and understand that not everyone likes to watch football but on average 60 percent of people watch each week. Hence my comment that the sport is not going anywhere.

  46. Lauren-I won’t date anyone who isn’t a football fan. Even my family and friends understand scheduling things around Cowboys games. But trust me- the NFL is still big business and very popular.

  47. “But by the same token, those who can’t imagine life without football also don’t grasp that it’s not a universal passion.”

    Agreed.

    It’s not that I think that it won’t be popular in the future. I just think that it has now peaked & will start declining & be more of a niche or regional sport & less universal n

    Also, I went to a HS where football was king. Not quite Texas, but I wouldn’t say Friday Night Lights was too far off. We won the state championship two of my four years there. There are peers of mine that were on those teams that don’t let their kids play. That is shocking to me & is part of what leads me to believe that there is a shift societally where it is becoming less acceptable in wide circles to let your child play tackle football. That will eventually have an effect on the popularity of the sport through all the levels.

  48. Sky – I tend to agree that grade schoolers missing school for a travel sport is over the top. I’ve never heard of this happening though. The most intense sport around here that I have any personal involvement in is swimming – and that is whole weekends & traveling to the next state. But no school missed.

    Kids would miss school for the Little League World Series most likely since its in the summer.

  49. It is not just flyover country that LOVES football if I were to judge by the number of J-E-T-S posts in my Facebook feed following the game on Sunday.

    Lauren, I didn’t know I was showing up in your facebook feed :)

  50. “Lauren-I won’t date anyone who isn’t a football fan.”

    Well, that would take me out of the running. :)

  51. “According to Nielsen ratings, 50 percent of baseball viewers are 55 or older, up from 41 percent 10 years ago. ESPN, which airs baseball, football and basketball games, says its data show the average age of baseball viewers rising well above that of other sports: 53 for baseball, 47 for the NFL (also rising fast) and 37 for the NBA, which has kept its audience age flat.”

    So, less people go to live events, and the television audience is getting older.

    And the average age of the US population is getting older. The median age of the U.S. was 37.7 in 2014, up from 35.3 in 2000 and 32.9 in 1990. So it only follows that the sports audience is also getting older.

    http://www.statista.com/statistics/241494/median-age-of-the-us-population/

  52. My daughter lived in a dorm named after the Pioneer Woman’s family. Another family member was a state senator while I was in college. My husband was in a fraternity with a couple of them, and actually got a job interview because if it. The hiring manager was a cousin and saw the fraternity on his resume, so gave him a call. They are a well recognized name in the state.

  53. “Would NOT miss school for the LLWS.”

    The last time a team from here was in the LLWS, many of the kids (and sibs) missed the beginning of the school year. Public schools here typically start their school year in the end of July.

  54. Among the families I know, only one family has their sons playing baseball. Baseball as a sport IMO was far more popular in the Northeast than it is here. I see a lot of kids playing soccer and I see families who prefer it, as at least at the rec level, they can have both their sons and daughters practice on the same weeknight and both boys and girls have their games on Saturdays. Martial arts is also popular, though many people don’t tend to mention it as a sport in casual conservation.

  55. I missed this fun discussion, but I have to go off topic for a minute, and respond to Rhett’s comment on yesterday’s thread: The violin is not sexy.

    Huh? What? Have you ever seen the Mekons play? Flogging Molly? Been to an Irish jam or a gypsy jam? How about Stefan Grappelli’s hot jazz back in the 30’s in France? Billy Bang’s swing jazz violin? Natalie MacMaster and Allison Kraus?
    Check out Gogol Bordello’s brand of cool fiddle and tell me that’s not sexy.

    OK, back to the fun sports topic!

  56. I love the fact that my DH isn’t obsessed with sports, I wouldn’t have wanted to marry someone that put a sporting event as top priority

  57. DH watches NFL. DS1 is in a FF league for both football and soccer. We watch at least one game every Sunday, and enjoy it. Neither of my kids play any sports. We put them in several sports, but they didn’t seem to like them enough to continue.

    They get their workouts from playing racquetball with DH, and from jogging/weights. They get their teamwork and leadership skills from scouts.

  58. Check out Gogol Bordello’s brand of cool fiddle and tell me that’s not sexy.

    This word — I do not think it means what you think it means.

  59. RMS–That made me laugh out loud.

    On topic, I think only the really Totebaggish who primarily spend time with other Totebaggers are likely to believe that football is significantly waning in popularity. I think that’s true amongst that set, but not elsewhere. As was mentioned above, the fact that people aren’t willing to pay exorbitant prices to attend NFL games is not necessarily an indication of waning interest.

  60. Flogging Molly?

    Mooshi, I met Nathan Maxwell a few months ago. I know he’s not the fiddler but he was still a cool guy.

  61. Anybody watch Friday Night Tykes? That will tell you all you need to know about the popularity of football in Texas.

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